Author Archives: NJUrbanForest

About NJUrbanForest

Love to explore, photograph and learn about NJ (and NY) urban forests

Exploring Montclair’s Yantacaw Brook Park!


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Yantacaw Brook Park

Welcome to the 11.5 acre Yantacaw Brook Park! The park (once part of the former site of the Upper Montclair Country Club) is located in Montclair, New Jersey and provides much needed open space and wildlife habitat.

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Plants of New Jersey # 3 Sweet-fern


Sweetfern

Sweet-fern

Welcome! Today’s plant we will discuss is the Sweet-fern (Comptonia peregrina). Sweet-fern’s name is misleading as it is not of the fern family but rather is a shrub that grows anywhere from 2 to 4 feet. Sweet-fern gets its name from a pleasant spicy scent it omits. The plant is found on the ridges of the mountains of West Milford generally on dry sterile ground. It is native to the east coast from Nova Scotia down to Georgia.

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Plants of New Jersey # 2 Eastern Skunk Cabbage


Skunk Cabbage

Eastern Skunk Cabbage spadix (right) with emerging leaf (left)

Welcome! Today we will discuss the lowly Eastern Skunk Cabbage (Symplocarpus foetidus), a plant that many may view in disgust due to its odor. That said, no other native plant can boast that it is the first of our native perennial spring wildflowers to bloom every year! You can find Skunk Cabbage in bloom as early as February though personally I have even seen it in bloom in December one year.

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Plants of New Jersey # 1 – Northern Red Oak


Welcome back! Today will be the first entry of a new series on NJUrbanForest.com.

The purpose will be to introduce to you some of the common plants of the forests of West Milford, NJ!

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Northern Red Oak

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Wildlife of Beach Haven’s Mordecai Island!


Mordecai Island

Eastern side of Mordecai Island

Welcome! Today we will be exploring the wildlife of Beach Haven’s Mordecai Island from a distance. Mordecai Island is named after Mordecai Andrews who owned over 900 nearby acres in the 1700s.

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