Category Archives: American Robin

Hiking Passaic County’s Friendship Park!


Friendship Park

Friendship Park

Welcome to Passaic County’s Friendship Park!

Friendship Park

Friendship Park

The 244 acre park, located in Bloomingdale, NJ consists of deciduous wooded uplands and wetlands.

Virtual Hike

(Trail Map taken from the Passaic County Parks Page)

Friendship Park Trail Map

The 0.9 Orange Blazed Trail (aka Friendship loop) we are going to follow was blazed courtesy of the New York-New Jersey Trail Conference.  Ok, ready to start?

Orange Trail Trailhead

Orange Trail Trailhead

From the parking area head east to the Orange Blazed Trailhead near a wetland.

Rock Formation

 

Turn left heading north on the trail. Immediately you will notice a large outcrop of rocks of precambrian origin. The rocks  are known as  “basement rocks” and were originally covered by soil and other rocks. Through the years due to natural activities such as past glacier action the rocks became exposed. Most of the rocks are thought to be comprised of ancient granite-gneiss.

Puddingstone

Puddingstone

Pudding stone rocks, seen above, are common in the NJ Highlands and consist of well-rounded quartz and red sandstone cobbles in a fine-grained red ironstone matrix.

Dry Stream

Dry Stream

After a few minutes, you will pass over a seasonal stream. Wait! Where’s the water? That’s a good question and I am glad you asked it. This stream is part of the wetlands that exist in Friendship park and only flows when the water table located below the surface gets too high such as in heavy downpours in spring.

Fence

 

Continuing on we come to the northern boundary of Friendship park which is seen here as a fence separating the park from an old abandoned golf course. Let’s stop and look around for a second. It seems we are not alone. There’s an American Robin & Eastern Gray Squirrel keeping watch over the forest.

American Robin

American Robin

Eastern Gray Squirrel

Eastern Gray Squirrel

Wait! What’s this? It’s an American Chestnut Sprout!

American Chestnut

American Chestnut

The American Chestnut tree was an important member of the eastern forest found in the United States. A wide variety of wildlife fed on its chestnuts. American Chestnuts began to die off in 1904 due to imported Chestnut Blight from Asia. The blight,  imported to the US via Asian chestnut trees, is a fungus dispersed by spores in the air, raindrops and animals. American Chestnut now survives only in the understory as shoots sprouting from old roots (which are not affected by the blight). The American Chestnut sprouts reach about twenty feet before the blight strikes. The roots then shoots up new sprouts and the process repeats itself. The American Chestnut Foundation  is currently working to restore the once great American Chestnut back to its native range. Check out the book American Chestnut : The Life, Death, and Rebirth of a Perfect Tree for more information. Click here!

Black Oak Coppice

Black Oak Coppice

Heading east now there is a slight climb where we see a large coppice Black Oak.  The orange blazed trail now continues on top of a large rock ledge.

Rock Ledge

Rock Ledge

The trail now starts to descend as we turn right and head south.  Be careful to follow the orange blazes here as there are other trails that are not blazed which meander through the forest. According to our trail map, it looks like we left the trail! Let’s head back and find the last blaze.

Back on the Trail!

Back on the Trail!

Whew! Back on the trail! Let’s stop and listen to the sounds of the forest: Sounds like we are hearing a White Breasted Nuthatch & a Blue Jay. Let’s continue on our hike!  Now we have arrived at the bottom of the descent.

Friendship Park Wetlands

Friendship Park Wetlands

Notice how the flora has changed. Before we came down here there was Chestnut Oak  but now we see the ground is wet and tussock sedge and Musclewood have appeared.

Musclewood

Musclewood

Turning right and heading north we are only a short distance from the trail’s end. But before we continue pause and check out those old growth White Oak Trees!

Massive Old Growth White Oaks

Massive Old Growth White Oaks

We have now come to the end of the orange trail and our exploration of Friendship Park.

Orange Trail End

Orange Trail End

Trail Update: There are now three connector trails within the orange loop, blazed red, yellow and blue. (Thanks John!)

Interested in checking out Friendship Park yourself? Check out below!

Directions (as taken from the NY NJ Trail Conference Website)

From I-287 north or south take Exit 53 (Bloomingdale) and turn left onto Hamburg Turnpike. Upon entering Bloomingdale, the name of the road changes to Main Street. In 1.3 miles (from Route 287), you will reach a fork in the road. Bear right (following the sign to West Milford), and in another 0.1 mile, turn right (uphill) onto Glenwild Avenue. Proceed for another 0.3 mile to the intersection of Woodward Avenue (on the left). Opposite this intersection, you will notice a dirt parking area bordered by stones on the right. Turn right and park here.

Northern Red Oak Friendship Park

Northern Red Oak Friendship Park

Feel free to comment below with any bird sightings, interesting plants, memories or suggestions! Thank you and have fun exploring!

Check out some great books below to learn more about NJ’s plants and wetlands!

  1. Wetlands
  2.  Plant Communities of NJ

 

Franklin Lakes Nature Preserve!


Franklin Lakes Nature Preserve

Franklin Lakes Nature Preserve

Welcome to a virtual tour of the Franklin Lakes Nature Preserve!

Entering Franklin Lakes Bergen County

Franklin Lakes Nature Preserve

Franklin Lakes Nature Preserve

 

The 147 acre preserve consists of three bodies of water (lagoon, upper lake and lower pond) deciduous wooded wetlands and wooded upland habitat. The Borough of Franklin Lakes purchased the land in 2006 from the Borough of Haledon for $6.5 million using funding from Green Acres and the Bergen County Open Space Fund. The preserve was open to the public in June of 2011.

Haldeon Reservoir

Upper Lake

The 75 acre Upper Lake is the centerpiece of the Franklin Lakes Nature Preserve and is an extremely popular fishing spot. The Upper Lake, created from the impoundment of the Molly Ann Brook in 1919, provided water to Haledon, North Haledon and Prospect Park. The Molly Ann Brook is the last tributary of the Passaic River before the Great Falls in Paterson.

Trails

Franklin Lakes Nature Preserve Trail Map

 

The Franklin Lakes Nature Preserve features 2 primary hiking trails. Access is available from Ewing Avenue, a small parking lot off of High Mountain Road and from nearby High Mountain Park Preserve’s Red Trail via Reservoir Drive and crossing High Mountain Road.

Shoreline Loop Trail

Shoreline Loop Trail

The main trail is the 1.5 mile white blazed Shoreline Loop Trail which encircles the entire Upper Lake and Lagoon.

Preserve Shoreline Trailhead on Haledon Reservoir Dam

Preserve Shoreline Trailhead on Upper Lake Dam

Starting from the parking area, the trail heads over the dam separating the Upper Lake from the small pond to the south. The trail follows alongside the Upper Lake and near High Mountain Road and Ewing Avenue.

Island Bridges Trail

Island Bridges Trail

The western portion of the Island Bridges Trail is accessible near where the Shoreline Loop Trail passes by Waterview Drive.

High Mountain as seen from the Franklin Lakes Nature Preserve

High Mountain as seen from the Franklin Lakes Nature Preserve

Beautiful views of the Upper Lake with High Mountain visible can be seen from this area. After exploring the western section of the Island Bridges Trail (the Island Bridges Trail is about a half a mile in length) head back to the  Shoreline Loop  trail which will briefly exit the Franklin Lakes Nature Preserve near an outflow from a neighboring swamp (you can also continue via two floating bridges on the Island Bridges Trail to continue to the eastern side of the Shoreline Loop Trail skipping the entire northern section).

Backwater Lagoon crossing

Backwater Lagoon crossing

Once the Shoreline Loop Trail enters back into the preserve, the trail crosses backwater of the lagoon.

Molly Ann Brook Crossing

Molly Ann Brook Crossing

Continuing on the trail you will cross the Molly Ann Brook over a wooden bridge. Frogs can be heard (and sometimes seen) splashing into the water here during the warmer months.

Frog

 

From here, the Shoreline Loop Trail heads east near a church and near a new housing development. Along the way, the trail comes across a basalt beach.

Basalt Beach

Basalt Beach

Basalt was  formed when molten lava extruded out of the earth’s surface and cooled rapidly. Basalt is found in nearby High Mountain Park Preserve which is situated on the 2nd Watchung Mountain. Once past the basalt beach, the trail turns south. The eastern section of the Island Bridges Trail is accessible from this point.

Island Bridges Trail

Island Bridges Trail

Reservoir Trail (East)

Reservoir Trail (East)

After exploring the eastern section of the Island Bridges Trail, head back to the Shoreline Loop trail and continue south until the trail terminates near a picnic area in a pine grove near where the trail began. Accessible Trails have been constructed in this area and intersect with Shoreline Loop Trail. The Accessible Trails will remain unblazed and are not currently maintained by the NYNJ Trail Conference.

Preserve Shoreline Loop Trailend

Preserve Shoreline Loop Trail-End

NYNJ Trail Conference has blazed and will maintain both the Shoreline Loop and Island Bridges Trails.

Flora

Flora found at the Franklin Lakes Nature Preserve includes the below among others:

American Beech

American Beech

Gray Birch

Gray Birch

Paper Birch

Paper Birch

Skunk Cabbage

Skunk Cabbage

Trout Lily

Trout Lily

Fauna

Fauna that I’ve spotted at the Franklin Lakes Nature Preserve includes:

Cedar Waxwing

Cedar Waxwing

Tufted Titmouse

Tufted Titmouse

Eastern Chipmunk

Eastern Chipmunk

American Robin

American Robin

Canadian Goose

Canada Goose

Canadian Geese Eggs

Canada Geese Eggs

Palm Warbler

Palm Warbler

 

 

Directions

Franklin Lakes Nature Preserve

This preserve is a great place to explore and just relax. Directions are listed below (as taken from the NYNJ Trail Conference Website)

Take N.J. Route 208 to the Ewing Avenue exit in Franklin Lakes. Turn left at the end of the ramp (if coming from the west, turn right) and continue for about two miles until Ewing Avenue ends at High Mountain Road. Turn left onto High Mountain Road and continue past a lake and a smaller pond on the left. In 0.5 mile, at the end of the smaller pond, you will see a small brown sign for the Franklin Lakes Nature Preserve on the left. Turn left into a driveway, passing old reservoir buildings on the right, then turn left again at a sign for parking and continue to a parking area just below the dam.

Note: Part of the preserve, including the entrance and parking, is in North Haledon (Passaic County).

The address for the preserve is 1196 High Mountain Road, North Haledon, N.J. 07508

CHECK OUT THE GONE HIKIN’ BLOG POST ON FRANKLIN LAKES NATURE PRESERVE HERE!

CHECK OUT DAN BALOGH’S PHOTOS OF FRANKLIN LAKES NATURE PRESERVE!

CHECK OUT THE LATEST BIRD SIGHTINGS HERE!

Feel free to comment below with any bird sightings, interesting plants, memories or suggestions!

Great Hiking/Ecology Books:

1. 60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: New York City: Including northern New Jersey, southwestern Connecticut, and western Long Island – Packed with valuable tips and humorous observations, the guide prepares both novices and veterans for the outdoors. From secluded woods and sun-struck seashores, to lowland swamps and rock-strewn mountain tops, this practical guidebook contains all the information needed to have many great hikes in and around New York City.

Click here for more information!

2. Take a Hike New York City: 80 Hikes within Two Hours of Manhattan – In Moon Take a Hike New York City, award-winning writer Skip Card shows you the best hikes in and around The Big Apple—all within two hours of the city.

Click here for more information!

3. Eastern Deciduous Forest, Second Edition: Ecology and Wildlife Conservation – This book is a useful tool for anyone who wants to know or hopes to help one of North America’s great natural resources.

Click here for more information!

4. Protecting New Jersey’s Environment: From Cancer Alley to the New Garden State – With people as its focus, Protecting New Jersey’s Environment explores the science underpinning environmental issues and the public policy infighting that goes undocumented behind the scenes and beneath the controversies.

Click here for more information!

5. Wild New Jersey: Nature Adventures in the Garden State:

Wild New Jersey invites readers along Wheeler’s whirlwind year-long tour of the most ecologically diverse state for its size in America.

Click here for more information!