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Hiking Ramapo Valley County Reservation!


 

Ramapo Valley Reservation Bergen County Dept of Parks

Ramapo Valley Reservation Bergen County Dept of Parks

Welcome to Ramapo Valley County Reservation! At 4,000 acres, Ramapo Valley County Reservation is Bergen County‘s largest park. The park has Ringwood State Park to the west and Ramapo Mountain State Forest to the southwest (both which are accessible by trails found in the park).

Ramapo Valley County Reservation Land Usage

Ramapo Valley County Reservation Land Usage

Ramapo Mountain County Park is located in the Ramapo Mountains which are a part of the NY NJ Highlands geographic region (Ramapo is said to be Lenape for “Round Ponds”).

Virtual Hike

Today’s hike will be an estimated 4.2  miles. We will be using this Trail Map to help us find our way through the woods.

Today’s virtual hike will take us pass a lake, the Ramapo River, ruins, scenic overview and a waterfall!

Ready to begin?

Ramapo Valley County Park Kiosk

Ramapo Valley County Park Kiosk

From the parking area just past the kiosk marks the start of the Orange Blazed 6.5 mile Shuber Trail (the longest trail found in Ramapo Valley County Reservation) and the .8 mile Silver blazed trail (All trails are maintained by volunteers of the NYNJ Trail Conference)

Shuber (Orange) & Silver Trailhead

Shuber (Orange) & Silver Trailhead

Heading west on the combined orange blazed Shuber and the Silver trail a bridge appears ahead crossing the Ramapo River.

Bridge over Ramapo River

Bridge over Ramapo River

The Ramapo River eventually flows into the Pequannock River to form the Pompton River which is a major tributary of the Passaic River. Whew! That’s a mouthful.

Scarlet Oak Lake

Scarlet Oak Lake

Continuing west, scenic Scarlet Oak Pond (once part of a former gravel quarry) appears to our right. I think it’s safe to say that the majority of people we will see on our hike will be found here walking their dogs (as this is an extremely popular park to bring your dog) around this beautiful pond.

Shuber Trail Left

Shuber Trail Left

Come on, let’s leave the crowds and take the path less traveled. Keeping our eyes peeled to the left we follow the Orange Blazed Shuber Trail as it leaves the Silver Trail heading south west following the Ramapo River through a floodplain forest where Red Maple is the staple tree.

Ramapo River

Ramapo River

We are lucky today. The trail which travels alongside the Ramapo River is relatively dry. During times of snowmelt and rainstorms this path would be inaccessible.

Shuber Trail passing Blue Trail end near bridge over MacMillan Stream

As we continue heading west on the orange blazed Shuber Trail we pass  the 3.0 mile Green on White Blazed Halifax Trail trailend to our right and cross over MacMillan Brook on a wooden footbridge.

Orange Trail Bridge Crossing

Orange Trail Bridge Crossing

At this point as you take in your surroundings you might start to question a couple of items. Is all this beauty actually in New Jersey? In Bergen County? The answer is a resounding yes!

But wait, what’s this before us? Old ruins of a stone cabin built by a church camp which once operated here appears as we turn right on the orange blazed Shuber trail. (update February 12, 2016: the ruins have been removed by the Bergen County Parks Department)

Cabin Ruins Orange Trail

The orange blazed Shuber trail starts climbing to the northwest of the Ramapo River. But don’t get discouraged by the climb, we are in a for a treat! Scenic cascades and pools of the Macmillan Brook parallels the trail to our right.

Cascades along orange trail

The Macmillan Brook is a tributary of the Ramapo River.

Orange Trail Silver Trailend

Orange Trail Silver Trailend

As we continue past the cascades we meet up with the trailend of the .8  of a mile Silver Trail we had originally started with the Shuber trail. As we turn right on the orange blazed Shuber trail, our footpath turns to an asphalt road.

Yellow Silver Trailhead

Yellow Silver Trailhead

Leaving the asphalt road and continuing on the orange blazed Shuber trail, the  1.6 mile Yellow Silver Trail appears to our left which traverses an area known as Matty Price Hill.

Macmillion Reservoir

Macmillion Reservoir

Passing the trailhead of the Yellow Silver Trail and continuing on the Shuber trail we pass a dam and outlet of Macmillan brook and see the beautiful estimated 13.11 acre MacMillan Reservoir to our  right.

Red Trail Trailhead

Red Trail Marsh Loop Trailhead

Continuing west past the reservoir the red blazed .3 mile Marsh Loop Trailhead appears to the south. Passing this trailhead we continue on our way traveling through an area of the Ramapo Mountains known as the Middle Valley.

Ridge Trail Trailhead

Ridge Trail Trailhead

A short distance ahead the 1.9 mile Blue Blazed Ridge trail appears to our right. Let’s take it!

Ridge Trail Macmillan Stream Tributary #1

Ridge Trail Macmillan Stream Tributary #1

Heading north and leaving the Shuber trail behind us we carefully walk on rocks over a couple of Macmillan Brook tributaries. I should probably mention here that these rocks and the Ramapo Mountains themselves are situated in a geologic area known as the Highlands Region. Dating from the pre-cambrian time period, these rocks are probably as old as the Earth itself.

Ridge Trail Stream 2

Ridge Trail Stream 2

Turning  right and heading southeast on the Ridge Trail the .8 Blue on White Havemeyer Trail appears to our left.

Ridge Trail & Blue on White Trailhead

Ridge Trail & Havemeyer Blue on White Trailhead

While we will be continuing on the Ridge Trail, the Havenmeyer trail explores a section of the Ramapo Mountains known as the Monroe Ridge. Though we can’t see it, an abandoned mine known as the Nickel Mine is found to the right of the Ridge Trail. The Nickel Mine is said to have been associated with the Hopkins and Dickinson Manufacturing Company which had operations producing bronze locks and iron castings in the 1870s along the Ramapo River. The Nickel Mine was created by digging two pits (both now are filled with water) in a search for nickel-bearing rock (hence the name Nickel Mine).

Ridge Trail Chestnut Oak Forest

Ridge Trail Chestnut Oak Forest

As we continue our walk on the Ridge Trail with the Monroe Ridge to our north we have left the forest of Birch and Beech we were passing through and have entered a Chestnut Oak Forest. Chestnut Oak Forest canopies are up to 65% dominated by its namesake species. Associate plant communities of Chestnut Oak Forest include:

Ridge Trail White Trailend

Ridge Trail White Trailend

Continuing southeast on the Ridge Trail we come across the trailend of the 1.0 mile White Trail which traverses across the Monroe Ridge which is located north of where we are now.

Ridge Trail Overlook Sign

Ridge Trail Overlook Sign

Heading south on the Ridge Trail a sign for a Scenic Overlook appears. Let’s take it!

Overlook

Overlook

Following a brief Red Triangle on a blue background we come to outcrops. The outcrops  are  “basement rocks” as the younger rocks which originally had covered them eroded away over time. Most of the rocks are thought to be comprised of ancient granite-gneiss.  Enough geology for now, let’s take a look at the view!  Here we have a great eastern view of the surrounding Ramapo Mountains along with Campgaw Mountain. Though we cannot see it today due to hazy conditions in the distance NYC may be seen on a clear day.

RidgeTrail End Silver Trail

RidgeTrail End Silver Trail

Heading back to the blue blazed Ridge Trail we turn south where the Ridge Trail ends at an intersection with the Silver Trail. Heading South on the Silver Trail we see a sign advertising a waterfall. Let’s check it out!

Waterfall

Waterfall

After a steep descent we come to the base where we have terrific views of the waterfall.

Waterfall Rocks

Waterfall Rocks

Whew! Believe it or not but we are almost done and it seems like we just got started! Alright, let’s head back to the Silver Trail.

Scarlet Oak Lake Return

Scarlet Oak Lake Return

Heading south on the the Silver Trail we pass scenic Scarlet Oak Pond where the orange blazed Shuber Trail joins us.

Silver Trail & Shuber Trail End

Silver Trail & Shuber Trail End

Well we have come to the end of the jointly blazed silver and shuber trail back at the parking lot where we began our hike. I hope you enjoyed our virtual hike and that it inspires you to check out Ramapo Valley County Reservation for yourself! Thanks for reading!

Wanna Hike Ramapo Valley County Reservation? Click Here for Directions!

Hiking/Ecology Books!

1.Eastern Deciduous Forest Ecology and Wildlife Conservation – This book is a useful tool for anyone who wants know or hopes to help one of North America’s great natural resources!

Click here for more information!

2. Don’t miss The Highlands: Critical Resources, Treasured Landscapes! The Highlands exemplifies why protection of New Jersey’s Highlands is so important for the future of the state. It is an essential read on the multiple resources of the region.

Click here for more information!

3.60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: New York City: Including northern New Jersey, southwestern Connecticut, and western Long Island – Packed with valuable tips and humorous observations, the guide prepares both novices and veterans for the outdoors. From secluded woods and sun-struck seashores, to lowland swamps and rock-strewn mountain tops, this practical guidebook contains all the information needed to have many great hikes in and around New York City.

Click here for more information!

4. Take a Hike New York City: 80 Hikes within Two Hours of Manhattan – In Moon Take a Hike New York City, award-winning writer Skip Card shows you the best hikes in and around The Big Apple—all within two hours of the city.

Click here for more information!

Feel free to Comment with Questions, Memories or Suggestions! Thank you and have fun exploring!

 

 

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Signs of Spring


Signs of spring have been slowly showing since the end of February when Skunk Cabbage flowers started to make an appearance.

Skunk Cabbage Flowers

And since the winter of 2010-2011 was an especially snowy and cold one, I thought it was important to show by way of photography how nature is renewing itself. Enjoy the spring photography tour!

Dutchman Breeches in Franklin Lakes Lorrimer Sanctuary

Dwarf Ginseng in Ridgewood's Grove Park

False Hellebore Sprouting in Ridgewood's Grove Park

Vernal Pond in Pequannock's Cherry Street Park

Trout Lilies carpeting floor of Hackensack's Borg's Woods

Spicebush blooming in Hackensack's Borg's Woods with understory of Skunk Cabbage

Pink Lady Slipper at Silas Condict County Park Kinnelon, NJ

Feel free to e-mail NJUrbanForest at NJUrbanForest@gmail.com with any comments, memories or suggestion! Thank you and have fun exploring!

Teaneck Creek Conservancy!


Welcome to the Teaneck Creek Conservancy!

Teaneck Creek Conservancy (TCC) is a  46 acre urban forested wetland located in Teaneck, NJ. The park is bordered to the north by Fycke Lane, DeGraw Avenue to the south, Teaneck Road to the west and Teaneck Creek to the east.  The park is owned by Bergen County and managed by the Teaneck Creek Conservancy.

Teaneck Creek Conservancy

TCC was founded in 2001 by the Puffin Foundation after red survey flags were found on the woodland in back of the building at 20 Puffin Way in Teaneck, NJ.  After discovering that the property was owned by the County of Bergen, TCC signed a long term licensing agreement with the county to allow it to develop the property into a park. The conservancy applied and received $500,000 from NJ Green Acres, $450,000 from Bergen County Parks Department and Open Space Trust Fund, $50,000 from the Puffin Foundation and $300,000 from the NJ Wetlands Mitigation Council to form trails, site improvements and wetland hydrology analysis.  Teaneck Creek Conservancy became part of Bergen County’s Overpeck Park system in July of 2004 and opened up to the public on May 7, 2006.

Artwork

The conservancy has created a natural masterpiece by blending the perfect mixture of artwork with nature.  The Puffin Sculpture Park greets you as soon as you arrive in the parking lot of the Puffin Cultural Forum.

Puffin Sculpture Park

Example of Artwork found in Puffin Sculpture Garden

More Artwork found in Puffin Sculpture Garden

Artwork may appear around the corner on any of TCC’s nature trails such as this wooden turtle (carved from a Black Locust tree trunk) which may be found on the blue trail or this wooden rabbit found near Dragonfly Pond off of the Red Trail.

Turtle carved from Black Locust Tree Trunk

Carved Rabbit Near Dragonfly Pond

Teaneck Creek

The 1.5 mile Teaneck Creek, for which TCC is named, is a tributary of Overpeck Creek which in turn is a tributary of the Hackensack River.

Teaneck Creek

There are two tributaries of Teaneck Creek found in the conservancy.

Tributary stream confluence with Teaneck Creek

95% of Teaneck Creek’s watershed is urban which causes flash hydrology during storm events.  Flash hydrology consists of the rapid movement of water through Teaneck’s storm system into Teaneck Creek, followed by a rapid elevation of water height, accelerated water flows and then a rapid return to low flow water levels. Flash hydrology can destabilize the stream channel by erosion of the stream banks.

Despite Teaneck Creek’s poor water quality due to non-point source pollution, the creek and surrounding wetlands and woodlands host a large diversity of wildlife. Wildlife that have been observed at TCC include:

Killifish

Female Mallard & Ducklings in Teaneck Creek

Wetland Restoration

Degraded Wetlands

The 46 acres which comprise Teaneck Creek Conservancy experienced degradation from dumping and filing of debris in the 1960’s during construction of the New Jersey Turnpike and Interstate 80.  The dumping of debris caused degradation in TCC’s wetlands by cutting off the historic hydrology to Teaneck Creek causing the wetlands to act more as a perched bog rather than a functioning riparian wetland.  A Conceptual Wetland Restoration Plan was developed for the preserve after three years of study by Rutgers University, United States Geologic Survey and TRC Omni.  The restoration plan essentially breaks the 46 acres into four sections (Section A, B, C & D).  Each section will have its own restoration plan based upon existing soil, vegetation and hydrology.

A, B, C & D Restoration Areas

Section A consists of 9 acres and is located in the northeastern section of the preserve near Fycke Lane.  Section A consists of the highest quality forested wetlands remaining in Teaneck Creek Conservancy. Analysis of the soil indicates that the 9 acres have remained unchanged for the past two to three hundred years.  The goal for this area is to maintain the existing conditions and protect the 9 acres from future negative environmental impacts that may occur.

Section B, at 15 acres is located in the heart of the Teaneck Creek Conservancy. A prominent feature of  Section B is a body of water known as Dragonfly Pond whose water comes directly from storm water runoff from nearby Teaneck Road.

DragonFly Pond

Dragonfly pond is surrounded by large stands of Common Reed.  The goal for Section B is to leave existing stands of Common Reed near the pond and prevent its spread by planting native shade trees.  Common Reed, though invasive, is useful in removing excess nutrients and sequestering contaminants from water.  In addition, given the source of water for Dragonfly Pond, the area is prone to drought conditions in the summer months.  Under drought conditions, obligate wetland plants such as Skunk Cabbage cannot survive.

While invasive plants such as Garlic Mustard and Mile-a-Minute Vine are found throughout Teaneck Creek Conservancy’s 46  acres, they are especially plentiful in the 14 acre Section C and 8 acre section D.

Mile-a-minute-weed and 1st year Garlic Mustard rosettes

Section C and D are located in the southeast and southwest section of the park respectively.  These areas of the park historically received the largest amount of disturbance during the construction of Route 80 and the NJ Turnpike.  The soil consists primarily of debris.  Only pockets of native vegetation remain in the 8 acre section D.  The restoration plan for section D indicates that 5-6 acres will be clear cut and reconfigured into a series of freshwater wetlands. 3 upland native wooden acres will be spared.  In Section C, a large clay berm was constructed in past wetland management efforts to help stem flooding from Teaneck Creek.   Restoration efforts call for the clay berm to be broken so that water will be able to flow and pool creating new freshwater wetland habitat naturally.

It is hoped that 20 new forested freshwater wetlands will be created from the Conceptual Wetland Restoration Plan for the Teaneck Creek Conservancy.

Mallards on Teaneck Creek

Trails


Teaneck Creek Conservancy features 3 trails. All trails are nearly flat. Blazes are created in the shape of a turtle and are colored and numbered. Trail maps are available near the entrance by the parking lot for the Puffin Cultural Forum. Click here for a map of Teaneck Creek Conservancy from the Teaneck Creek Conservancy website.

Red Trail

Red Trail

The handicapped accessible .65 of a mile red trail traverses the preserve from DeGraw Avenue to Fycke Lane. Starting from the Puffin Cultural Parking lot, the red trail leaves the parking lot heading down wooden stairs where artwork known as “Migration Milestones” showcases pictures of migratory birds and facts.

Red Knot Migration Milestone

This information is all carved on old cement which was previously dumped in the conservancy during construction of the intersection of nearby I-80 and I-95.

Silver Maple Red Trail

From here, the red trail heads north or south. Heading south, the red trail passes upland forest to the east which contains a big Silver Maple with a label near blaze R2.

Bergen County Audubon Society Butterfly Garden (before its official opening)

Continuing south, the red trail passes by the newly (as of July 2012) opened Bergen County Audubon Society’s Butterfly Garden.

The idea for the garden came about in the fall of 2011 and funding from the Bergen County Audubon and National Audubon Society helped make the dream a reality.  Native plants such as Swamp Milkweed, Buttonbush, Ironweed and Spicebush among others were planted for a two fold purpose. The first is to provide habitat for butterflies to lay eggs and for their caterpillars to eat. The second purpose is to provide nectar sources for butterflies. It is hoped other species of wildlife will be attracted to the butterfly garden as well.

Japanese Knotweed

Volunteers from three groups assisted with the project. The Teaneck Creek Weed Warriors cleared the garden of non native vegetation such as Japanese Knotweed and Porcelain Berry. Volunteers from the Teaneck Garden Club (members stored plants over the winter donated by Metropolitan Plant Exchange. Finally, members from the Bergen County Audubon Society completed the planting and will maintain the garden.

The butterfly garden marks the first time native plants have intentionally been planted to replace invasive species at TCC.

Updated Green Trail as of July 2012 (circled area)

Heading closer to DeGraw Avenue, a new section (as of July 2012) of Green trail appears to the northeast. Turning back north, the red trail retraces its steps and heads back to the entrance of the TCC.  A little north of the main entrance, the red trail comes to a “T” near blaze R4. Turning left (west) this section of the red trail heads to Puffin Place and the Blue Trail.

Teaneck Creek Conservancy

Heading east, the red trail comes to blaze R5 with upland forest to the south and dense scrub shrub land to the north. Heading northeast, the red trail passes the green trail to the east and heads past Dragonfly Pond to the west near blaze R7.

Dragonfly Pond

This section of the red trail  follows the historic public service trolley route which was in service from 1899-1938. The public service trolley route connected Paterson to Edgewater where a ferry took passengers to NYC.

Remains of Historic Public Trolley Route on Red Trail

Continuing north, the red trail comes to the 5 Pipes. The five pipes were leftover massive drainage pipes that are large enough to stand in. Rather than discard them, volunteers painted the interiors and exteriors to represent five eras of time.

Fives Pipes before any work was done

Primer with sketching

Completion!

The exteriors of the five pipes represent natures flora and fauna found at the Teaneck Creek Conservancy across time.  The interiors of the five pipes represent the human relationship to TCC in 5 different historical eras. These eras include:

1.        Native American (The Lenape)

2.       Colonial Period (The Dutch and the English)

3.       A new nation’s early years (1776-1899)

4.       USA: The 20th Century

5.       USA: The 21st Century and Beyond

From here, the northern end of the Green trail is accessible immediately after the five pipes to the east near Teaneck Creek. A bridge crossing Teaneck Creek from the Heritage Point of Teaneck is found here.

Massive Black Willow

Continuing north, two massive Black Willows can be found at blazes R10 and R11 respectively. Near blaze R12, the Blue Trail is accessible to the west. Continuing north, the red trail crosses Teaneck Creek in the Fycke Woods section. (FYI: Fycke, is a Dutch word meaning fish or animal trap)

2 Gray Catbirds Teaneck Creek Conservancy

The Red Trail parallels Teaneck Creek to the west and comes to an outdoor ecology classroom at blaze R14. The outdoor ecology classroom is located near the highest quality forested wetlands remaining in TCC (Section A near Fycke Lane). The location of the classroom was previously surrounded by large dense stands of Common Reed. After most of the Common Reed was removed, native trees, shrubs and herbaceous species were planted. The outdoor ecology classroom was built after receiving funding of $100,000 from private and public sources in 2003. The classroom has four 12-foot long benches, a boardwalk and a 30 foot –wide  five-sided opening in the middle that looks down into wetlands.

Outdoor Ecology Classroom

The red trail ends at Fycke Lane where the Fycke Lane Interpretive Project at Teaneck Creek Conservancy is found.

Welcome to the Fycke Lane Entrance of the Teaneck Creek Conservancy

The Fycke Lane Interpretive Project was conceived in 2003 and constructed in 2011 after being funded with a grant from the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation.

Fycke Lane Entrance

The project consists of 8 educational signs which provide illustrations and information on landscape perspectives ranging from habitat, wealth, and history among other landscape perspectives. The signs were constructed by a wall made of recycled materials. These signs will be replaced from time to time to provide fresh perspectives. The Fycke Lane Interpretive Project opened Earth Day in 2012.

Green Trail

Green Trail

Starting from the red trail near DeGraw Avenue, the rustic estimated .41 of a mile green trail traverses northeast to the Lenape Turtle Peace Labyrinth at blaze G2.

Lenape Turtle Peace Labyrinth Teaneck Creek Conservancy

The Labyrinth, located inside a Cottonwood Forest, was made from rubble found in Teaneck Creek Conservancy.

Labyrinth this way

The turtle shaped Labyrinth was created to honor the Hackensack Lenape Native Americans whose lands included the TCC.

Labyrinth Summer

Labyrinth Winter

The Lenape Native Americans believed that the world began when a giant turtle swam to the surface of an ocean that covered the earth and the turtle’s back supported the continent. Hikers are encouraged to follow the rubblestone to the center of the labyrinth. A sign posted at the entrance states  “A walk to the labyrinth’s center can provide an opportunity to meditate, heal and grow”.

Brown Headed Cowbird Teaneck Creek Conservancy

From the labyrinth, the green trail continues through the cottonwood forest until it reaches Teaneck Creek at blaze G8.  Here there is a bridge crossing Teaneck Creek connecting the Glen Pointe Development with TCC. The green trail continues north following Teaneck Creek to the east. The Green Trail ends at the Red Trail at blaze G10 near the Five Pipes.

An interesting note is the green trail is the only trail in the park system that was designed and built by volunteers. The red and blue trail were designed and built by contractors.

Blue Trail

Blue Trail

The woodchip lined .27 of a mile blue trail traverses the northwestern section of TCC. Starting from Puffin Place, the blue trail heads north through a dense area of wetlands and reeds and passes a picnic area known as Black Walnut Meadow near blaze B4.

2009 Windows on the Park Exhibit

Black Walnut Meadow is the location of one of the first ongoing art exhibits I saw at Teaneck Creek Conservancy: Windows on the Park. Generally once a year, old window frames are taken and hung up alongside the blue trail to challenge the separation between public and private spaces.

Windows on the Park Public Space-Private Space

Windows on the Park IV April-May 2012

After leaving the Black Walnut Meadow, the blue trail heads north through wetlands and connects to the red trail at blaze B8 near the red trail’s R12.

Flora

TCC includes over 140 native species of plants including:

 Check out Plant Communities of New Jersey.

NJ’s geology, topography and soil, climate, plant-plant and plant-animal relationships, and the human impact on the environment are all discussed in great detail. Twelve plant habitats are described and the authors were good enough to put in examples of where to visit!

Click here for more information!

Click here for directions to this unique urban wetland. Click here to check out the official website of Teaneck Creek Conservancy.

Great Ecology/Hiking Books!

1. Eastern Deciduous Forest Ecology and Wildlife Conservation – This book is a useful tool for anyone who wants know or hopes to help one of North America’s great natural resources!

Click here for more information!

2. 60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: New York City: Including northern New Jersey, southwestern Connecticut, and western Long Island – Packed with valuable tips and humorous observations, the guide prepares both novices and veterans for the outdoors. From secluded woods and sun-struck seashores, to lowland swamps and rock-strewn mountain tops, this practical guidebook contains all the information needed to have many great hikes in and around New York City.

Click here for more information!

Feel free to e-mail NJUrbanForest at NJUrbanForest@gmail.com with any comments, memories or suggestion! Thank you and have fun exploring!

References:

http://www.teaneckcreek.org/

http://cues.rutgers.edu/teaneckcreek/pdfs/01-atmospheric-2006-report.pdf

http://urbanhabitats.org/v05n01/history_full.html

http://urbanhabitats.org/v05n01/hydrology_full.html

http://urbanhabitats.org/v05n01/restore_full.html

http://urbanhabitats.org/v05n01/wetland_full.html

http://urbanhabitats.org/v05n01/vegetation_full.html

http://www.nynjtc.org/hike/teaneck-creek-conservancy

James A. McFaul Environmental Center!


James A McFaul Environmental Center

The James A McFaul Environmental Center is an 81 acre nature preserve located in Wyckoff, NJ.

James McFaul Environmental Center

The environmental center was originally a pig farm and was acquired by Bergen County in 1962 with assistance from Green Acres.  It was named the James A. McFaul Environmental Center in 1990 to honor a Bergen County parks director who did much to acquire this beautiful nature preserve.

Pond

The 2.5 acre pond was created in 1966 by impounding a Goffle Brook tributary.

Goffle Brook Tributary

A boardwalk extends out over wetlands and provides views of the pond.

Environmental Boardwalk

The educational center, which looks out into the pond, includes freshwater aquariums, educational signage and live native animal displays.

Life in a Pond Educational Display

There are outdoor animal shelters which features Porcupine, White-Tailed DeerGolden Eagle, Red Fox, Eastern Screech Owls and Red-Tailed Hawk exhibits among others.

Porcupine

Outdoor Turtle Display

In addition to live animal displays, the James A. McFaul Environmental Center provides much needed habitat to a multitude of birds and other native wildlife such as:

Mourning Dove

Brown-Headed Cowbird

Canada Goose

White-Tailed Deer

Wild Turkey

Eastern Chipmunk

Muskrat

Near the entrance to the environmental center, there are Rhododendron and seasonal Daffodil gardens to be enjoyed.

Gardens

Nature Trail

Welcome to the Nature Center!

The preserve features a 2/3 of a mile interpretive nature trail which loops around a seasonal swamp and upland.

Deciduous wooded wetlands

As you wind along the path, keep your eyes peeled for wildlife such as White-Tailed Deer, Eastern Chipmunks and Red-Tailed Hawks. Frequent signage appears on the trail to help the hiker to identify the surrounding flora and fauna.

Lowland Habitat Interpretive Signage

Tree Cavity Interpretive Signage

Flora includes the below among others:

Check out Plant Communities of New Jersey.

NJ’s geology, topography and soil, climate, plant-plant and plant-animal relationships, and the human impact on the environment are all discussed in great detail. Twelve plant habitats are described and the authors were good enough to put in examples of where to visit!

Click here for more information!

Want to check out the James A. McFaul Environmental Center for yourself? Click here for directions (or put this address in your GPS: 150 Crescent Ave. Wyckoff, NJ 07481)!

Saddle River County Park!


Bergen County’s Saddle River County Park is a wonderful 577 acre linear greenway which parallels the Saddle River.  There are six park areas and a historic site which are all linked by a paved path which may be used by bicycles, pedestrians and roller skating.  Click here to view maps of the six areas of the trail.  The total length of the trail is six miles. Mileage signs appear every tenth of a mile on the path to help see how far you have progressed.

Fishing is allowed throughout the park with a license at the trout stocked Saddle River and Ho-Ho-Kus Brook as well as the three ponds found throughout the park. (The Ho-Ho-Kus Brook is trout stocked from Whites Pond in Waldwick until its confluence with the Saddle River).

Saddle River Pathway BEGIN

The northern section of the park begins in Ridgewood at the Wild Duck Pond Area. The Ridgewood Area of the park features the Wild Duck Pond, Dog Run, picnic area and playground.

Wild Ducks at Wild Duck Pond

The trail continues through to Glen Rock, Fair LawnParamus, Saddle Brook and Rochelle Park. On the way to Paramus and Glen Rock areas the trail passes by Ridgewood’s Grove Park, a 32 acre Beech-Oak forest which features hiking trails.
Pathway

Saddle River County Park Glen Rock

The Glen Rock Area features a pond, playground and tennis. The Ho-Ho-Kus Brook flows to the east of the park. The brook has no mow zones to help clean the water and provide habitat for wildlife.

Heading south from the Glen Rock Area will go to the Fair Lawn Area which features soccer and a section for hangers/gliders and to the Dunkerhook Area of the park in Paramus.  Dunkerhook (which means “Dark Corner”) was named by the Dutch who first settled in this area in the early 18th Century.  This section of the park features a beautiful waterfall at the confluence of the Ho-Ho-Kus Brook with the Saddle River in addition to a picnic area and playground.

Waterfall at confluence of Ho-Ho-Kus Brook and Saddle River

Saddle River County Park Dunkerhook Area

Just south of the Dunkerhook Area and after passing underneath Route 4 is the Easton Tower.

Easton Tower

The Easton Tower was initially built in 1900 to pump water for the estate of Edward Easton who made his fortune as a founder in the recording industry and was president of the Columbia Phonograph Company. Water from the tower was pumped to several fountains. Construction of nearby Route 208 divided the estate and isolated the tower. The tower was acquired by Bergen County in 1956 and restored a few years later. An earlier red mill tower which stood in its place sometimes leads to the present tower being mistakenly called the “Red Mill”.

Remixed

Once pass the Easton Tower, the trail leads to the Otto C. Pehle Area in Saddle Brook. This section features a pond, model boating (permit required), ball fields, playground and picnic areas.

Otto C. Pehle Area

Canada Geese

The final and most southern area of the linear park is the Rochelle Park Area.

Saddle River County Park Rochelle Park

This section of the park features basketball, tennis, and a picnic area. The trail’s terminus is at Railroad Avenue.

Trail Terminus at Railroad Ave

Flora at the park include:

Fauna includes the below among others:
Groundhog

Groundhog

White-Breasted Nuthatch

White-Breasted Nuthatch

Great Egret

Great Egret

Cottontail Rabbit

Cottontail Rabbit

Painted Turtle

For more information check out the NY NJ Trail Conference description.

Hiking/Ecology Books!
1. 60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: New York City: Including northern New Jersey, southwestern Connecticut, and western Long Island – Packed with valuable tips and humorous observations, the guide prepares both novices and veterans for the outdoors. From secluded woods and sun-struck seashores, to lowland swamps and rock-strewn mountain tops, this practical guidebook contains all the information needed to have many great hikes in and around New York City.

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2. Take a Hike New York City: 80 Hikes within Two Hours of Manhattan – In Moon Take a Hike New York City, award-winning writer Skip Card shows you the best hikes in and around The Big Apple—all within two hours of the city.

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3. Eastern Deciduous Forest, Second Edition: Ecology and Wildlife Conservation – This book is a useful tool for anyone who wants to know or hopes to help one of North America’s great natural resources.

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4. Protecting New Jersey’s Environment: From Cancer Alley to the New Garden State – With people as its focus, Protecting New Jersey’s Environment explores the science underpinning environmental issues and the public policy infighting that goes undocumented behind the scenes and beneath the controversies.

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