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Hiking Mountainview Nature Park!


Mountainview Nature Park

Mountainview Nature Park

Welcome to Mountainview Nature Park!

Mountainview Nature Park

Mountainview Nature Park

Located in Central Nyack in Rockland County NY, the 83 acre park features an estimated 2.5 miles of hiking trails winding their way through an Oak-Hickory forest.

Mountainview Nature Park Forest

Mountainview Nature Park Forest

Mountainview Nature Park was acquired as a gift from the Winston Perry family by Rockland County in 1979.

Geology

Diabase Rocks

Diabase Rocks

The land comprising Mountainview Nature Park is part of the Palisades ridge. The Palisades extend from Staten Island NY to Mount Ivy NY. The rocks are known as diabase. Diabase was formed around 200 million years ago by molten magma intruding into softer sedimentary rocks.

Virtual Hike

Mountain Trail Trailhead

Mountain Trail Trailhead

From the parking area on Strawberry Hill Lane we find ourselves at the trailhead of the orange blazed Mountain Trail. At 1.15 miles, the Mountain Trail is the longest trail found in Mountainview Nature Park. We will use this trail map to help guide us. Ready? Let’s go!

Bridge over Hackensack River Tributary

Bridge over Hackensack River Tributary

Heading east on the Mountain Trail, we cross a Hackensack River tributary on a wooden bridge.

NY Thruway

NY Thruway

Dipping south we see (and hear) the NY State Thruway straight ahead near another Hackensack River tributary.

Rock Wall Mountain Trail

Rock Wall Mountain Trail

Turning north on the Mountain Trail we see several old stone walls of farms that existed here at one time.

Goat Trail Trailhead

Goat Path Trailhead

Continuing north on the Mountain Trail the white-blazed trailhead of the .60 mile Goat Path appears to our right. Let’s take it!

Pileated Woodpecker

Pileated Woodpecker (a bit on the blurry side)

Heading southeast on the Goat Path a large American Crow size bird with a bright patch of red on its head flies over us. It’s a Pileated Woodpecker! This guy is on the ground poking through fallen snags for its favorite food: carpenter ants.

Goat Trail Climb

Goat Path Climb

Leaving the Pileated Woodpecker behind we continue southeast on the Goat Path and start to climb uphill.

Building near Goat Path

Building near Goat Path

Coming to the edge of the eastern border of Mountainview Nature Park with a building visible straight ahead, the Goat Path turns left climbing northwest along the edge of a hillside.

Goat Path Hillside

Goat Path Hillside

Careful! We have to really watch our footsteps here. Whew! We’ve arrived near the top.

Goat Path Chestnut Oak

Goat Path Chestnut Oak

At the top of the mountain Chestnut Oak and Eastern Red Cedar are abundant.

Goat Path Eastern Red Cedar

Goat Path Eastern Red Cedar

From here the Goat Path turns right heading southeast through an Oak-Hickory forest. Trees present in this forest include:

Mountain Trail Intersection

Mountain Trail Intersection

Just ahead we come to an intersection with the orange blazed Mountain Trail we left awhile ago. But for now, let’s head south on the Overlook Spur section of the Goat Path.

White-Tailed Deer

White-Tailed Deer

As we walk on the Goat Path we spot a White-Tailed Deer  to our left watching us.

Goat Path Trailend

Goat Path Trailend

Leaving the deer we continue southwest to the Goat Path terminus.

Palisades Center Mall & NY Thruway with Ramapo Mountains in distance

Palisades Center Mall & NY Thruway with Ramapo Mountains in distance

Let’s take a breather to see the view. Directly in front of us is the Palisades Center Mall with the NY Thruway heading west towards the distant Ramapo Mountains. Ready to continue on? Let’s turn back and head back to the Mountain Trail intersection.

Mountain Trail

Mountain Trail

We are now leaving the white blazed Goat Path and heading east on the Mountain Trail.

Bear Swamp Trailhead

Bear Swamp Trailhead

Just to the left of the Mountain Trail is the western trailhead of the blue blazed .28 mile Bear Swamp Trail loop. Let’s go explore it!

Bear Swamp

Bear Swamp

The Bear Swamp Trail loops around Bear Swamp and will take us back to the Mountain Trail. Bear Swamp, which is seasonally flooded, is a hardwood swamp dominated by Red Maple, one of the more common trees found in the eastern forest. Shrubs such as Spicebush are quite abundant in the understory.

Royal Fern

Royal Fern

Ferns such as Cinnamon and Sensitive Fern are also abundant in Bear Swamp. While they are gone since we are in late fall, we still see the remains of Royal Fern.

Bear Swamp Trailend

Bear Swamp Trailend

Completing our loop, we find ourselves back on the Mountain Trail at the eastern entrance to the Bear Swamp trail. We can either continue heading east (which leads to Mountainview Avenue and the Long Path) or we can retrace our footsteps and head west. Since it’s getting late, let’s head west on the Mountain Trail.

Mountainview Nature Park Mountain Trail

Mountainview Nature Park Mountain Trail

Passing the Goat Path we are now heading west on the Mountain Trail.

Decaying Log

Decaying Log

As we walk we pass by numerous blow downs and old decaying logs. These old logs play an important ecological role in the forest. Decaying logs retain moisture and release nutrients into the ground that aid in new plant growth.

Posted Private Property

Posted Private Property

Heading southwest on the Mountain Trail, we pass near the northern boundary of the park near private property.

Hudson River Mountain Trail

Hudson River Mountain Trail

Walking southwest on the Mountain Trail we can just catch glimpses of the distant Hudson River through the remaining leaves on the trees to our left.

Mountain Trail Descent

Mountain Trail Descent

We’ve now begun our climb down the western border of the hill we climbed earlier on the Goat Path. This trail will take us back down pass the trailhead of the Goat path and back to our car.

Mountain Trail End

Mountain Trail End

We made it back to our car. Thank you so much for joining me today on this virtual hike of Mountainview Nature Park. I hope that it inspires you to visit and hike the park yourself in person!

Directions: (as taken from the NYNJ Trail Conference website)

To reach the park, take NY 303 to North Greenbush Road and follow it to Strawberry Hill Lane. Parking is available off Strawberry Hill Lane.

Feel free to Comment with Questions, Memories or Suggestions! Thank you and have fun exploring!

Hiking/Ecology Books!

1. The Nature of New York – An Environmental History of the Empire State – This work offers a sweeping environmental history of New York State

Click here for more information!

2. Eastern Deciduous Forest Ecology and Wildlife Conservation – This book is a useful tool for anyone who wants know or hopes to help one of North America’s great natural resources!

Click here for more information!

3.60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: New York City: Including northern New Jersey, southwestern Connecticut, and western Long Island – Packed with valuable tips and humorous observations, the guide prepares both novices and veterans for the outdoors. From secluded woods and sun-struck seashores, to lowland swamps and rock-strewn mountain tops, this practical guidebook contains all the information needed to have many great hikes in and around New York City.

Click here for more information!

4. Take a Hike New York City: 80 Hikes within Two Hours of Manhattan – In Moon Take a Hike New York City, award-winning writer Skip Card shows you the best hikes in and around The Big Apple—all within two hours of the city.

Click here for more information!

http://www.nynjtc.org/park/mountainview-county-nature-park

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Exploring Rockefeller State Park Preserve’s Swan Lake!


The Rockefeller State Park Preserve

The Rockefeller State Park Preserve

Welcome to the Rockefeller State Park Preserve! Located in Sleepy Hollow, NY, the 1,000 + acre park features a variety of habitats ranging from open meadows, deciduous forest & wetlands. Rockefeller State Park Preserve is listed as an “IBA” (Important Bird Area) by the National Audubon Society. Over 180 species of birds have been documented in the preserve!

Female Yellow Warbler

Female Yellow Warbler

Common birds (depending on the time of the year) found in the preserve include the belong among others:

Virtual Tour

Rockefeller State Park Trail Map

Rockefeller State Park Trail Map

Welcome! Today, using the map above, we are going to explore the Swan Lake area of the Rockefeller State Park Preserve! (Click here for a trail map of the Rockfeller State Park Preserve)

Swan Lake

Swan Lake

The 22 acre Swan Lake was created by impounding a tributary of the Pocantico River (a tributary of the Hudson River).

Carriage Road Rockefeller State Park Preserve

Carriage Road Rockefeller State Park Preserve

The carriage roads we will be walking on were developed by John D Rockefeller Sr & John D Rockefeller Jr between the years 1910-1950. Every winter the Friends of the Rockefeller State Park Preserve evaluates which trails need fresh surface material added.  Drainage of trails is completed every spring to ensure carriage roads stay dry. Trail maintenance is a 12 month process!

Virtual Tour

After paying the minimal parking fee ($6 at the time of this writing) let’s walk over to the visitor center.

Japanese Peony

Japanese Peony

After picking up a trail map let’s check out the interesting flowering plants blooming nearby. These flowers are Japanese Peony and are known as the “King of Flowers” in Japan.

Information about The Rockefeller State Park Preserve

Just past the flowers and the visitor center there is a  kiosk chock full of information about the Rockefeller State Park preserve.

Birds and Wildflowers of the Preserve

Birds and Wildflowers of the Preserve

Here we can find excellent information regarding common flora and fauna of the preserve. All set? Let’s head towards Swan lake!

Fern Garden

Fern Garden

But first let’s poke around the Fern Garden found just past the visitor center. The fern garden is populated with Cinnamon, Royal & Sensitive Ferns among other species including some rather large Jack-in-the-Pulpits!

Jack-in-the-Pulpit

Jack-in-the-Pulpit

Leaving the Fern Garden we follow a brief trail through a forest to get to Brother’s Path.

Brother's Path

Brother’s Path

We are going to be following the 1.1 mile Brother’s Path which encircles Swan Lake.

Swan Lake

Swan Lake

As we start out heading south on the Brother’s Path, the trailhead of the .7 mile Overlook Trail appears to our right.

Overlook Trail

Overlook Trail

Let’s take a quick detour from Brother’s Path to walk a section of the  Overlook Path for a few minutes. According to the Hudson River Audubon Society website this area is one of the best spots to view Eastern Bluebirds. Eastern Bluebirds, New York’s state bird, are a small thrush whose habitats include open woodlands and meadows such as where we are right now.  Eastern Bluebird populations have experienced a decline due to strong competition from aggressive non-native birds like the House Sparrow and European Starlings.

Eastern Blue Bird (NY's State Bird!)

Eastern Blue Bird (NY’s State Bird!)

As we ponder the future fate of these birds a blue blur flies by and lands on a nesting box which has been placed in the meadow by a member of the Rockefeller State Park Preserve staff.  Ready to head back to the Brother’s Path? Let’s head back to continue our journey around Swan Lake. Heading south on Brother’s Path we see continuous views of Swan Lake mixed with occasional Flowering Dogwood to our left.

Flowering Dogwood

Flowering Dogwood

Flowering Dogwood, native to the eastern United States, is a common understory tree found in forest edges.

Rockefeller State Park Preserve Meadow

Rockefeller State Park Preserve Meadow

Continuing south an opening has appeared to our right providing a view of the sweeping meadows we sampled on the Overlook Trail. As we walk Swan Lake is becoming narrower. Turning east we cross over two Pocantico River tributaries draining Swan Lake.

American Beech Trees

American Beech Trees

Skunk Cabbage

Skunk Cabbage

We pass near a few American Beech trees and a Skunk Cabbage dominated wetland.

Farm Meadow Trail Trailhead

Farm Meadow Trail Trailhead

Passing the Farm Meadow Trailhead to our south we continue to follow the Brothers Path heading north. Swan Lake is now on our left.

Swan Lake to our left

Swan Lake to our left

Canada Mayflower in bloom

Canada Mayflower in bloom

As we walk, we pass Canada Mayflower to our left in bloom. Canada Mayflower is part of the Lily family and native to the Eastern United States.

Eastern Chipmunk near it's home

Eastern Chipmunk near it’s home

A sudden squeak makes an Eastern Chipmunk known to us.

Northern Black Racer (Thanks Brian!)

Northern Black Racer (Thanks Brian!)

I’m not sure if the chipmunk is sounding the alarm over us or this Northern Black Racer lurking nearby. Maybe both?

Gray Catbird

Gray Catbird

As we leave the chipmunk and snake we hear a sudden “meow” sound and realize that the sound is not coming from a cat but a bird! The bird is  a Gray Catbird. Gray Catbirds are migratory and fly to the southeaster US, Mexico and Central America for the winter months.

Striped Wintergreen

Striped Wintergreen

Continuing north and passing the trailhead to the Ridge Trail, we spot some Striped Wintergreen, a species which is considered vulnerable in New York.

Mallards near Swan Lake

Mallards near Swan Lake

Turtle Swan Lake

We cross over a Swan Lake feeder stream and pass a couple of Mallards and a turtle as we head west on the Brothers Path back to the parking lot to complete our hike. I hope you enjoyed this virtual tour of Swan Lake and that it inspired you to visit it for yourself!

Click here for directions!

Recommended Books:

1) WALKABLE WESTCHESTER – The book covers over 180 parks with almost 600 miles of trails in Westchester County.

Click here for more information!

2) The Nature of New York – This work offers a sweeping environmental history of New York State. Author David Stradling shows how New York’s varied landscape and abundant natural resources have played a fundamental role in shaping the state’s culture and economy.

Click here for more information!

3) Eastern Deciduous Forest Ecology and Wildlife Conservation – This book is a useful tool for anyone who wants know or hopes to help one of North America’s great natural resources!

Click here for more information!

Feel free to comment with any questions, memories or suggestions! Thank you and have fun exploring!

Little Ferry’s Losen Slote Creek Park!


Losen Slote Creek Park

Welcome to the 28 acre Losen Slote Creek Park! The Park is located in Little Ferry, NJ and contains 26 acres of woodland and meadows. 2 acres are dedicated to recreation.

Losen Slote Creek Park Boundaries

The park, named for the creek which flows through it, was created in 1990 by an agreement with the Borough of Little Ferry and the New Jersey Meadowlands Commission (NJMC). The NJMC has a 99 year lease agreement with Little Ferry for public access. Losen Slote Creek Park has the Little Ferry Department of Public Works to the north, the Bergen County Utilities Authority Nature Preserve to the east, Losen Slote on its western border and the Richard P Kane Natural Area to the south.

Losen Slote Creek Park

Habitat found in the preserve includes forested freshwater wetlands, meadows and a portion of the Losen Slote Creek, a major tributary of the lower Hackensack River watershed. The name “Losen Slote” is of Dutch origin and translates to “curvy creek”. As such, the name of the park translates to “Curvy Creek Creek Park”. 🙂

Losen Slote

Losen Slote is not influenced by tidal waters because of a tide gate that is present near Losen Slote’s confluence with the Hackensack River. The tide gate was installed by the Bergen County Mosquito Authority around 1921. Losen Slote has been labeled by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection as “FW2-NT/SE2”. This classification indicates that these waters do not contain trout (NT=No Trout) and are a mixture of fresh and salt water.

May 6, 2012 NJMC & Bergen County Audubon Society Tour

Birders in Losen Slote Creek Park

The New Jersey Meadowlands Commission (NJMC) (now known as the NJ Sports and Exposition Authority) & the Bergen County Audubon Society led a 1.5 mile 2 hour tour of Losen Slote Creek Park on May 6, 2012 to look for migrating birds and other wildlife.

The trail map of Losen Slote along with the color blazed trail map is shown below:

Losen Slote Creek Park Trail Map

Losen Slote Creek Park Trail Map

Jim Wright formerly of the previously named New Jersey Meadowlands Commission  informed the group of the different habitats found in the park before the tour began.

I was happy to attend because it provided a chance to explore & undertake a deeper understanding of the flora & fauna that can be found in Bergen County’s sole remaining lowland forest.

Losen Slote Creek Park Wet Meadow Habitat

After the group assembled in the parking lot, we stopped near the entrance to the forest by a wet meadow where Solitary Sandpipers and Greater Yellowlegs were poking around. Most attendees commented that they had never seen so many Solitary Sandpipers gathered in one spot before.

Losen Slote Creek Park Trail

After entering the forest, the group almost immediately spotted a Baltimore Oriole and at least 2 Scarlet Tanagers high in the trees (and too high for me to get a picture). I did get a picture of a Gray Catbird who was singing a territory song.

Gray Catbird

Soon after I took the picture of the catbird, a splash was heard in a nearby ditch as a Muskrat made a quick getaway which I caught on camera as a blur.

Blurry Muskrat

As we traveled further into the woods, a good amount of native flora was present:

Don Torino of the Bergen County Audubon Society with Mayapple in Bloom

Arrowwood

Black Cherry In Bloom

Sweet Pepperbush

Canada Mayflower In Bloom

Cinnamon Fern

Gray Birch became the dominant species as the group came into the meadows portion of the preserve.

Gray Birch

Reaching the creek turtles were spotted basking on a rock and a surprised Great Blue Heron flew away before I could get its picture.

Turtles on a rock in the Losen Slote

As we got into the meadows there were plenty of butterflies (especially the Red Admiral) flying around.

Losen Slote Creek Park Field Habitat

A Brown Thrasher was waiting for the group in the meadows and put on quite a show.

Brown Thrasher

Heading in, Raccoon tracks were found in the mud on parts of the trail.

The group did notice some Mile-A-Minute, an invasive plant which had sections eaten by insects which  were released in the park to control Mile-A-Minute from taking over.

Mile-a-Minute Insect Holes

Reaching near the end of the trail, the group turned back to the forest and to the parking lot where the tour concluded.

Check out Plant Communities of New Jersey.

NJ’s geology, topography and soil, climate, plant-plant and plant-animal relationships, and the human impact on the environment are all discussed in great detail. Twelve plant habitats are described and the authors were good enough to put in examples of where to visit!

Click here for more information!

Losen Slote

Many thanks to the NJMC & Bergen County Audubon Society for hosting an excellent walk! Check out the Meadowlands Blog or the Bergen County Audubon Society’s webpage for information regarding future events!

Click here for directions to Losen Slote Creek Park!

Feel free to e-mail NJUrbanForest at NJUrbanForest@gmail.com with any comments, memories or suggestion! Thank you and have fun exploring!

Books on the Meadowlands!

1. The Nature of the Meadowlands – The Nature of the Meadowlands illuminates the region’s natural and unnatural history, from its darkest days of a half-century ago to its amazing environmental revival.

Click here for more information!

2. The Meadowlands: Wilderness Adventures on the Edge of a City – Author Robert Sullivan proves himself to be this fragile yet amazingly resilient region’s perfect expolorer, historian, archaeologist, and comic bard.

Click here for more information!

3. Meadowlands: A Wetlands Survival Story – Slowly but surely, with help from activist groups, government organizations, and ordinary people, the resilient creatures of the Meadowlands are making a comeback, and the wetlands are recovering.

Click here for more information!

4. Fields of Sun and Grass: An Artist’s Journal of the New Jersey Meadowlands – The book has three central parts, respectively called “Yesterday,” “Today,” and “Tomorrow.” Each covers a different time period in the ecological life of the Meadowlands.

Click here for more information!

Hiking West Milford’s Kanouse Mountain!


Kanouse Mountain

The 2011 Pequannock River Coalition Fall Hike took place in West Milford’s Kanouse Mountain located in the Newark Watershed lands. The mountain is part of West Milford’s baker’s dozen-a series of mountains you can hike in West Milford.

Attendees of 2011 PRC Fall Hike near trail entrance off Route 23

The 1,100 foot Kanouse Mountain is located off of Route 23 North near Echo Lake Road in the Newfoundland section of West Milford. Dense woodlands surround the mountain to the north, Echo Lake is to the north east, Kanouse Brook is to the west, the Echo Lake Channel is to the east and Route 23 is to the south and southeast.

Kanouse Brook Tributary

Kanouse Brook has a naturally regenerating trout population and drains into the Pequannock River.

Attendees of the hike parked off of Old Route 23 near the NJ Transit Park & Ride and walked to the entrance of the trail off of Route 23 North near the entering Newfoundland sign.

Entering Newfoundland

The hike took place on unmarked wood roads starting in a northeast direction to the summit of Kanouse Mountain where a large star, American flag and outstanding views were present.

Star on top Kanouse Mountain

US Flag on top of Kanouse Mountain

View of Charlottesburg Reservoir from top of Kanouse Mountain

Views of Route 23

View of Copperas Mountain (Foreground) & Green Pond Mountain (Background)

Charlottesburg Reservoir was formed from the impoundment of the Pequannock River which is given C1 water classification. The C1 classification is used to indicate that the river is relatively unspoiled in comparison to other rivers in NJ.

As with all Pequannock River Coalition Hikes, Ross Kusher (the executive director of PRC) discussed different points of interest along the hike including ecology and geology. This interesting information makes a hike much more than a physical journey. The information provided by Ross’s expertise boosts the strength of your mind as you learn new aspects of your surroundings.

Fall Colors

The geology of Kanouse Mountain and the surrounding highlands is estimated to be between 400-435 million years old and thought to be from the Silurian Period of the Paleozoic Era. Past glacier activity courtesy of the Wisconsin Glacier is evident by gentle slopes on the north side of the mountain and a sudden drop on the south side.  As the Wisconsin glacier moved through the area 10,000 years ago it pushed rocks and carved out hillsides creating this phenomenon present throughout the highlands region.

Small trace amounts of copper have been found alongside the much more abundant iron in the highlands region. It is said that nearby Copperas Mountain was named so because of the copper that was once taken from it.

Coyote Footprint

Occasionally the group came across muddy areas when the trail crossed through wetlands. These muddy spots are prime spots to look for animal prints. Ross pointed out this Eastern Coyote print found in the picture above.

Wood Frog

The group found this Wood Frog near the trail. Though hard to tell from this photo, wood frogs generally look like they have a robber’s mask on due to the dark patch which extends backward from their eye. These frogs are often found in moist wooded areas.

American Chestnut Leaf

American Chestnut saplings were found periodically in the forest. Once a dominant tree in the forest canopy, the Chestnut blight has reduced the tree to the shrub layer. Once the American Chestnut reaches about twenty feet or so the blight strikes and kills it. The tree may die, but the root structure is still alive and sends up new sprouts. The American Chestnut Foundation is working to defeat the blight and restore its former footprint.

Other flora found includes these among others:

Northern Red Oak

Shagbark Hickory

Christmas Fern

Chestnut Oak

Ground Pine

Ross explained that Black Bears love the fruits of Shadbush. He once tasted the berries and compared them to wet cardboard. White Oak Ross said was cherished by wildlife for its sweet acorns.

The hike was an estimated six miles and went in a loop fashion so that attendees came out the same way the came in.  What a great fall hike!

The Pequannock River Coalition holds three hikes a year (Fall, Winter and Spring). They are worth checking out!

Remember, to hike in the Newark Watershed land a permit is required. For more information on  obtaining a Newark watershed permit click here.

Feel free to e-mail NJUrbanForest at NJUrbanForest@gmail.com with any comments, memories or suggestion! Thank you and have fun exploring!

Bonnabel Nature Park at Lachmund’s Bend!


Bonnabel Nature Park at Lachmund’s Bend

Bonnabel Nature Park (Click Image to Enlarge)

Welcome to Old Tappan’s Bonnabel Nature Park! The park’s 3.26 acres consists of uplands and wetlands and is a pleasant respite from the suburban development that surround it. The park has the Hackensack River and its remnant watershed lands to the west and south, Old Tappan Road to the north, and additional remnant Hackensack River watershed lands to the east.

The land which became Bonnabel Nature Park at Lachmund’s Bend was purchased October 17, 2007 from the Bonnabel family by the borough of Old Tappan for $950,000 with a combination of Green Acres, Borough Open Space and Municipal Bond Ordinance funding for use as open space. The park was established in 2008.

The 3.26 acre site is situated next to the trout stocked upper Hackensack River (which is given C1 Status at this location) and United Water watershed land.

Hackensack River

Bonnabel Nature Park features trails, picnic tables, benches and fishing.

Flora at the park includes:

The property was once the site of a popular hotel called Lachmunds which existed from the late 1800’s until it was demolished in 1954. Today, instead of a hotel, the land is a beautiful nature preserve for the people of Old Tappan and surrounding communities to enjoy.

Bonnabel Nature Park at Lachmund’s Bend is located off of Old Tappan Road near Recktenwald Court by the Rivervale border. Click here for directions. Please note that Unfortunately, yahoo maps does not recognize the park’s entrance as an address. These directions will culminate to Recktenwald Court.  The park is located just southeast of Recktenwald Court on Old Tappan Road. A gravel lot in the park is provided for parking.

Feel free to e-mail NJUrbanForest at NJUrbanForest@gmail.com with any comments, memories or suggestion! Thank you and have fun exploring!

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