Advertisements
Archive | Indoor Nature Exhibit RSS for this section

Exploring Westchester County’s Lenoir Preserve!


Lenoir Preserve Kiosk

Lenoir Preserve Kiosk

Welcome to the Lenoir Preserve! Located in Yonkers, New York, the estimated 40 acre preserve features upland woodlands, a large lawn, nature center, butterfly garden, an old mansion and old ruins scattered throughout.

The preserve opened in 1978 and is part of the Westchester County Park System. The property was acquired in two purchases in the 1970’s.

Virtual Tour

You Are In An Incredibly Important Place

You Are In An Incredibly Important Place

Welcome to the Lenoir Preserve! Before we start our hike let’s head over to the nature center to check out the displays and pick up a trail map.

Lenoir Preserve Nature Center

Lenoir Preserve Nature Center

The Lenoir Preserve Nature Center displays natural exhibits throughout and is also the meeting point of the Hudson River Audubon Society, a chapter of the National Audubon Society.

Inside Lenoir Nature Preserve

Inside Lenoir Nature Preserve

Heading out, we pass a picture of a map of the preserve including the route we will be taking today.

Lenoir Preserve Trail Map

Lenoir Preserve Trail Map

Ready to begin?

White Trail Trailhead

White Trail Trail-head

Heading west from the nature center we find the trail-head of the estimated .70 of a mile White Trail under a stand of dense evergreen trees.

Tulip Tree

Tulip Tree

Heading southeast into the forest we pass by the trunk of a massive Tulip Tree. Found throughout the forest of the Lenoir Preserve, the Tulip Tree is native to the Eastern United States and is one of the tallest trees found on the eastern seaboard.

Building near White Trail

Building near White Trail

Continuing southeast on the white trail a large apartment building appears straight ahead through the trees. This will be the last reminder of the modern urban environment as we trek through the woods.

Old Manmade Pond

Old Manmade Pond

Continuing our walk we find an old man-made pond. The pond still fills with water from an old pipe buried underground.

Wineberry

Wineberry

As we walk a twisty looking plant known as Wineberry is found all around us. Wineberry is native to Asia and an established invasive plant in the United States.

Hudson River View White Trail

Hudson River View White Trail

Continuing our walk heading south we spot seasonal views of the Hudson River and the New Jersey Palisades through the trees.

 

White Yellow Trail

White Yellow Trail

A little further on a yellow trail has joined the White Trail from the west.

 

Stone Steps Wooden Bridge

Stone Steps Wooden Bridge

Let’s head west briefly on the yellow trail for a moment to see where it goes.

Croton Aqueduct

Croton Aqueduct

The Yellow Trail leads right to the Croton Aqueduct trail which is a New York State Park. This trail goes over a huge old masonry water tunnel which once provided water to thirsty New Yorkers until 1965.  The trail was created in 1968.

Stairs Yellow Trail

Stairs Yellow Trail

Leaving the Croton Aqueduct and heading east we temporarily pass the White Trail. Old stairs appear to the east leading to terraces. Let’s go take a look.

Archway Yellow Trail

Archway Yellow Trail

An ancient Archway appears near the end of the yellow trail. I don’t know about you, but I feel a pair of eyes watching us.

Song Sparrow

Song Sparrow

It’s a Song Sparrow! Song Sparrows favor brushy areas such as where we spotted this one or should I say it spotted us.

Yellow Trail Beginning

Yellow Trail Beginning

Let’s head back down the Yellow trail to continue our journey on the white trail in Lenoir’s forest.

White Trail Rock Path

White Trail Rock Path

As we walk more ruins appear as the sun filters through the leafless trees.

White Trail Ruins

White Trail Ruins

This may have been part of a fireplace of the destroyed “Ardenwold” Mansion which once existed in the site. The Ardenwold Mansion was destroyed by fire in the 1970’s.

White Blaze on Black Birch

White Blaze on Black Birch

Nearing the southern border of the Lenoir Preserve the White Trail turns east.

Northern Mockingbird

Northern Mockingbird

We’ve been spotted and the alarm has been sounded! A Northern Mockingbird is keeping careful watch over the woodlands of the Lenoir Preserve.

Alder Mansion

Alder Mansion

Leaving the woodlands an old ruined wall with an ancient looking gazebo gazes mournfully at us. We have reached the southern border of the Lenoir Preserve. The ruined wall and gazebo are part of the Alder Manor which was built around 1912 by William Boyce Thompson. The manor is private property operated by the Tara Circle, an Irish Cultural Center.

Alder Mansion Garden

Alder Mansion Garden

Peaking through an old iron gate we see an expansive old garden.

Crows Chasing Hawk

Crows Chasing Hawk

Leaving the White Trail and heading north to the Great Lawn we spot some commotion in the open sky above. American Crows are chasing an unidentified Hawk.

Lenoir Mansion

Lenoir Mansion

Now heading north through the great lawn, the expansive Lenoir Mansion appears to our right. The mansion was built between in the mid-to late 1800’s for presidential candidate Samuel J. Tilden from granite quarried on site.The mansion is named after Lenoir, North Carolina by a later owner by the name of C.C. Dula who added additional wings to the mansion.

Mourning Dove

Mourning Dove

As we walk pass the Lenoir Mansion heading north a mournful sound fills our ears. It’s source is this Mourning Dove keeping watch over us as we walk.

Gazebo

Gazebo

An old stone gazebo appears just north of the mansion as we walk. What’s that sound?

Blurry Deer

Blurry Deer

White-Tailed Deer! They spotted us long before we spotted them.

Beverly E Smith Butterfly Garden

Beverly E Smith Butterfly Garden

Just west of the gazebo is a massive butterfly garden  which was created in 1995 by volunteers of the Hudson River Audubon Society. The garden is named after a Beverly Smith who came up with the idea to plant the garden. The garden has showcased a rare Rufous Hummingbird in the past. The Rufous Hummingbird normally occurs in the far west of North America and winters in Mexico.

Northern Flicker

Northern Flicker

Heading back towards the nature center a curious looking spotted bird is seen on the ground. It’s a Northern Flicker! Northern Flickers, such as this one, spend a lot of time searching for food in the form of ants and other insects on the ground.

 

Bird Feeders Rain Garden

Bird Feeders Rain Garden

We’ve reached the back of the nature center where bird feeders tempt hungry birds and a rain garden is present during the growing season. With that we’ve concluded  our walk of the preserve. Thank you for joining me today. It is my hope that this virtual tour inspires you to visit the Lenoir Preserve to check it out for yourself!

Feel free to Comment with Questions, Memories or Suggestions! Thank you and have fun exploring!

Hiking/Ecology Books!

1. The Nature of New York – An Environmental History of the Empire State – This work offers a sweeping environmental history of New York State

Click here for more information!

2. Eastern Deciduous Forest Ecology and Wildlife Conservation – This book is a useful tool for anyone who wants know or hopes to help one of North America’s great natural resources!

Click here for more information!

3.60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: New York City: Including northern New Jersey, southwestern Connecticut, and western Long Island – Packed with valuable tips and humorous observations, the guide prepares both novices and veterans for the outdoors. From secluded woods and sun-struck seashores, to lowland swamps and rock-strewn mountain tops, this practical guidebook contains all the information needed to have many great hikes in and around New York City.

Click here for more information!

4. Take a Hike New York City: 80 Hikes within Two Hours of Manhattan – In Moon Take a Hike New York City, award-winning writer Skip Card shows you the best hikes in and around The Big Apple—all within two hours of the city.

Click here for more information!

 

Advertisements

Englewood’s Flat Rock Brook Nature Center!


Welcome to Flat Rock Brook

Welcome to Flat Rock Brook

Englewood’s Flat Rock Nature Preserve consists of 150 acres of second growth woodland, wetlands, meadows, gardens and ponds and nature building managed by Flat Rock Nature Association, a non-profit organization which hosts educational programs.

Englewood Flat Rock Nature Preserve

Englewood Flat Rock Nature Preserve

75 acres of the preserve are city owned Green Acres lands and 75 acres consist of the former Allison Woods Park which officially became part of Flat Rock Nature Preserve in 1988.

William O. Allison Memoriam

The preserve is surrounded on the north, south and west by dense residential housing. Englewood Cliffs is to the east of the preserve. Flat Rock Nature Preserve is a remnant section of a once massive hardwood forest on the western palisades.  This forest remained intact until about 1859 when large scale logging occurred to provide railroad ties for the northern railroad which had extended into Englewood.  Overtime, the forest grew back on land that was to become the Flat Rock Nature Preserve.

Flat Rock Brook Forest

A Walk in the Woods

In the fall of 2012 a new permanent exhibit in the nature center known as “A Walk in the Woods” was completed. The exhibit showcases the four primary habitats found at Flat Rock:

Meadow

Meadow

Forest

Forest

Pond, Stream & Wetlands

Pond, Stream & Wetlands

Each exhibit has interactive puzzles, information fact cards & flip-books on the flora and fauna found in each habitat. Speaking of fauna, this  Turtle has a home in “A Walk in the Woods”

Turtle

Northern Red Oak Eastern Screech Owl

Northern Red Oak Eastern Screech Owl

The exhibit’s centerpiece is a life size 15 foot replica of a Northern Red Oak  (NJ’s state tree) with various wildlife including an Eastern Screech Owl.

Birds of Flat Rock Nature Preserve

Birds of Flat Rock Nature Preserve

Near the window where bird feeders have been placed are descriptions of common birds found at Flat Rock including their vocalizations!

American Goldfinch

American Goldfinch

I saw this American Goldfinch when I last visited.

Watershed Exhibit

Watershed Exhibit

The display also has exhibits on non-point source pollution and how it affects the Hackensack River watershed.

History of the Land

Over the years, several development proposals threatened the forest.  In 1900, a few acres of the future nature preserve experienced quarrying which occurred until 1925. Today, the staging area of the quarry is the present day parking area of the nature center. A handicap accessible .1 of a mile boardwalk, constructed in 1989, goes near cliffs that were exposed during the quarry operations.

Quarry Boardwalk

Quarry Boardwalk Trail

Around 1907, a huge cemetery was proposed for the woods of Flat Rock but was declined by the city due to the land being unsuited for this purpose.  In 1927 Paterno Construction Company bought land in the future preserve in order to construct residential development. Roads were constructed throughout Flat Rock’s forest. Construction of the houses was soon to follow but the great depression occurred effectively canceling the development.  The roads became the foundation of the present trails found in the nature preserve.  Over the next few decades new development threats came and went but the woods remained.

In 1968, the citizens of Englewood voted to approve a city bond issue to acquire and preserve the remaining open land in Englewood.  In 1973, the organization that would become Flat Rock Nature Preserve was formed to manage the preserved open space.

Flat Rock Brook

Flat Rock Brook

Flat Rock flows into the preserve from the north.  The brook is a tributary of the Overpeck Creek (Flat Rock’s confluence with the Overpeck Creek is just south of the border between Englewood and Leonia) which is a tributary of the Hackensack River.  Flat Rock Brook is classified as FW2-NT (Fresh water, non-trout). The water quality has been designated as poor as indicated by the variety and number of sampled invertebrates. The water quality was tested by the Flat Rock Brook Nature Association which formed a stream study team to evaluate the health of Flat Rock. Recently, the Flat Rock Brook Nature Association received a grant of $9, 625 to help restore Flat Rock Brook by encouraging native plant species and removing invasive exotic plants. The grant was received from the Watershed Institute.

Killifish in Flat Rock Brook

Flat Rock Ponds

A prominent feature of Flat Rock Brook Nature Preserve is its Quarry Pond.

Turtles in Quarry Pond

Quarry Pond is located to the south of the preserve near the nature center’s building. Quarry Pond has not been dredged since the 1970s. Sediment from nearby trails have been filling in the pond causing decreasing oxygen levels. Duckweed, an aquatic plant, has taken over the pond.  In the fall of 2010, city officials voted to use funds from an unused 2007 bond ordinance to dredge the pond. In the summer of 2012 dredging of Quarry Pond commenced and was completed in the fall of 2012.

If Quarry pond wasn’t dredged, it would have disappeared and become a marshland which was the fate of Flat Rock’s MacFadden’s Pond. MacFadden’s Pond is now known as MacFadden’s wetland due to sedimentation filling in much of the pond. MacFadden’s wetland was formed by the damming of Flat Rock Brook as it enters the preserve from the north and is found in the northern area of the preserve.

MacFadden’s Wetland

The city of Englewood approved a dredging project for the pond in 2007 but when the cost to dredge the pond was found to be more than a million dollars, the dredging plan was canceled.

Trails

Flat Rock Brook Trail Map

Flat Rock Brook Trail Map

In addition to the quarry boardwalk, the preserve features over three miles of trails.

Red Trail

The red trail is the longest at 1.2 miles and traverses the heart of the preserve and helps to connect Macfadden’s wetland with the nature center.  The white trail, at .6 encircles the nature center and goes through gardens and around Quarry Pond.  The .6 orange trail traverses in the western section of the preserve near Flat Rock.

Orange Trail

The yellow trail goes over a mystery bridge (called a mystery because the bridge appeared mysteriously one weekend) near Macfadden’s wetland and back to the red trail. Click here for a trail map.

Mystery Bridge

Flora and Fauna

The preserve features flora such as:

Milkweed

Check out Plant Communities of New Jersey.

NJ’s geology, topography and soil, climate, plant-plant and plant-animal relationships, and the human impact on the environment are all discussed in great detail. Twelve plant habitats are described and the authors were good enough to put in examples of where to visit!

Click here for more information!

Fauna found in Englewood’s Flat Rock Brook Nature Center includes:

Eastern Chipmunk

The preserve is open for hiking seven days a week from dawn to dusk. Click here for directions.

 Check out below for more information regarding Northern NJ’s Forest Community and environment!

1. Eastern Deciduous Forest, Second Edition: Ecology and Wildlife Conservation – This book is a useful tool for anyone who wants to know or hopes to help one of North America’s great natural resources.

Click here for more information!

2. Protecting New Jersey’s Environment: From Cancer Alley to the New Garden State – With people as its focus, Protecting New Jersey’s Environment explores the science underpinning environmental issues and the public policy infighting that goes undocumented behind the scenes and beneath the controversies.

Click here for more information!

Feel free to comment with any questions, memories or suggestions! Thank you and have fun exploring!

%d bloggers like this: