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Hiking Ramapo Valley County Reservation!


 

Ramapo Valley Reservation Bergen County Dept of Parks

Ramapo Valley Reservation Bergen County Dept of Parks

Welcome to Ramapo Valley County Reservation! At 4,000 acres, Ramapo Valley County Reservation is Bergen County‘s largest park. The park has Ringwood State Park to the west and Ramapo Mountain State Forest to the southwest (both which are accessible by trails found in the park).

Ramapo Valley County Reservation Land Usage

Ramapo Valley County Reservation Land Usage

Ramapo Mountain County Park is located in the Ramapo Mountains which are a part of the NY NJ Highlands geographic region (Ramapo is said to be Lenape for “Round Ponds”).

Virtual Hike

Today’s hike will be an estimated 4.2  miles. We will be using this Trail Map to help us find our way through the woods.

Today’s virtual hike will take us pass a lake, the Ramapo River, ruins, scenic overview and a waterfall!

Ready to begin?

Ramapo Valley County Park Kiosk

Ramapo Valley County Park Kiosk

From the parking area just past the kiosk marks the start of the Orange Blazed 6.5 mile Shuber Trail (the longest trail found in Ramapo Valley County Reservation) and the .8 mile Silver blazed trail (All trails are maintained by volunteers of the NYNJ Trail Conference)

Shuber (Orange) & Silver Trailhead

Shuber (Orange) & Silver Trailhead

Heading west on the combined orange blazed Shuber and the Silver trail a bridge appears ahead crossing the Ramapo River.

Bridge over Ramapo River

Bridge over Ramapo River

The Ramapo River eventually flows into the Pequannock River to form the Pompton River which is a major tributary of the Passaic River. Whew! That’s a mouthful.

Scarlet Oak Lake

Scarlet Oak Lake

Continuing west, scenic Scarlet Oak Pond (once part of a former gravel quarry) appears to our right. I think it’s safe to say that the majority of people we will see on our hike will be found here walking their dogs (as this is an extremely popular park to bring your dog) around this beautiful pond.

Shuber Trail Left

Shuber Trail Left

Come on, let’s leave the crowds and take the path less traveled. Keeping our eyes peeled to the left we follow the Orange Blazed Shuber Trail as it leaves the Silver Trail heading south west following the Ramapo River through a floodplain forest where Red Maple is the staple tree.

Ramapo River

Ramapo River

We are lucky today. The trail which travels alongside the Ramapo River is relatively dry. During times of snowmelt and rainstorms this path would be inaccessible.

Shuber Trail passing Blue Trail end near bridge over MacMillan Stream

As we continue heading west on the orange blazed Shuber Trail we pass  the 3.0 mile Green on White Blazed Halifax Trail trailend to our right and cross over MacMillan Brook on a wooden footbridge.

Orange Trail Bridge Crossing

Orange Trail Bridge Crossing

At this point as you take in your surroundings you might start to question a couple of items. Is all this beauty actually in New Jersey? In Bergen County? The answer is a resounding yes!

But wait, what’s this before us? Old ruins of a stone cabin built by a church camp which once operated here appears as we turn right on the orange blazed Shuber trail. (update February 12, 2016: the ruins have been removed by the Bergen County Parks Department)

Cabin Ruins Orange Trail

The orange blazed Shuber trail starts climbing to the northwest of the Ramapo River. But don’t get discouraged by the climb, we are in a for a treat! Scenic cascades and pools of the Macmillan Brook parallels the trail to our right.

Cascades along orange trail

The Macmillan Brook is a tributary of the Ramapo River.

Orange Trail Silver Trailend

Orange Trail Silver Trailend

As we continue past the cascades we meet up with the trailend of the .8  of a mile Silver Trail we had originally started with the Shuber trail. As we turn right on the orange blazed Shuber trail, our footpath turns to an asphalt road.

Yellow Silver Trailhead

Yellow Silver Trailhead

Leaving the asphalt road and continuing on the orange blazed Shuber trail, the  1.6 mile Yellow Silver Trail appears to our left which traverses an area known as Matty Price Hill.

Macmillion Reservoir

Macmillion Reservoir

Passing the trailhead of the Yellow Silver Trail and continuing on the Shuber trail we pass a dam and outlet of Macmillan brook and see the beautiful estimated 13.11 acre MacMillan Reservoir to our  right.

Red Trail Trailhead

Red Trail Marsh Loop Trailhead

Continuing west past the reservoir the red blazed .3 mile Marsh Loop Trailhead appears to the south. Passing this trailhead we continue on our way traveling through an area of the Ramapo Mountains known as the Middle Valley.

Ridge Trail Trailhead

Ridge Trail Trailhead

A short distance ahead the 1.9 mile Blue Blazed Ridge trail appears to our right. Let’s take it!

Ridge Trail Macmillan Stream Tributary #1

Ridge Trail Macmillan Stream Tributary #1

Heading north and leaving the Shuber trail behind us we carefully walk on rocks over a couple of Macmillan Brook tributaries. I should probably mention here that these rocks and the Ramapo Mountains themselves are situated in a geologic area known as the Highlands Region. Dating from the pre-cambrian time period, these rocks are probably as old as the Earth itself.

Ridge Trail Stream 2

Ridge Trail Stream 2

Turning  right and heading southeast on the Ridge Trail the .8 Blue on White Havemeyer Trail appears to our left.

Ridge Trail & Blue on White Trailhead

Ridge Trail & Havemeyer Blue on White Trailhead

While we will be continuing on the Ridge Trail, the Havenmeyer trail explores a section of the Ramapo Mountains known as the Monroe Ridge. Though we can’t see it, an abandoned mine known as the Nickel Mine is found to the right of the Ridge Trail. The Nickel Mine is said to have been associated with the Hopkins and Dickinson Manufacturing Company which had operations producing bronze locks and iron castings in the 1870s along the Ramapo River. The Nickel Mine was created by digging two pits (both now are filled with water) in a search for nickel-bearing rock (hence the name Nickel Mine).

Ridge Trail Chestnut Oak Forest

Ridge Trail Chestnut Oak Forest

As we continue our walk on the Ridge Trail with the Monroe Ridge to our north we have left the forest of Birch and Beech we were passing through and have entered a Chestnut Oak Forest. Chestnut Oak Forest canopies are up to 65% dominated by its namesake species. Associate plant communities of Chestnut Oak Forest include:

Ridge Trail White Trailend

Ridge Trail White Trailend

Continuing southeast on the Ridge Trail we come across the trailend of the 1.0 mile White Trail which traverses across the Monroe Ridge which is located north of where we are now.

Ridge Trail Overlook Sign

Ridge Trail Overlook Sign

Heading south on the Ridge Trail a sign for a Scenic Overlook appears. Let’s take it!

Overlook

Overlook

Following a brief Red Triangle on a blue background we come to outcrops. The outcrops  are  “basement rocks” as the younger rocks which originally had covered them eroded away over time. Most of the rocks are thought to be comprised of ancient granite-gneiss.  Enough geology for now, let’s take a look at the view!  Here we have a great eastern view of the surrounding Ramapo Mountains along with Campgaw Mountain. Though we cannot see it today due to hazy conditions in the distance NYC may be seen on a clear day.

RidgeTrail End Silver Trail

RidgeTrail End Silver Trail

Heading back to the blue blazed Ridge Trail we turn south where the Ridge Trail ends at an intersection with the Silver Trail. Heading South on the Silver Trail we see a sign advertising a waterfall. Let’s check it out!

Waterfall

Waterfall

After a steep descent we come to the base where we have terrific views of the waterfall.

Waterfall Rocks

Waterfall Rocks

Whew! Believe it or not but we are almost done and it seems like we just got started! Alright, let’s head back to the Silver Trail.

Scarlet Oak Lake Return

Scarlet Oak Lake Return

Heading south on the the Silver Trail we pass scenic Scarlet Oak Pond where the orange blazed Shuber Trail joins us.

Silver Trail & Shuber Trail End

Silver Trail & Shuber Trail End

Well we have come to the end of the jointly blazed silver and shuber trail back at the parking lot where we began our hike. I hope you enjoyed our virtual hike and that it inspires you to check out Ramapo Valley County Reservation for yourself! Thanks for reading!

Wanna Hike Ramapo Valley County Reservation? Click Here for Directions!

Hiking/Ecology Books!

1.Eastern Deciduous Forest Ecology and Wildlife Conservation – This book is a useful tool for anyone who wants know or hopes to help one of North America’s great natural resources!

Click here for more information!

2. Don’t miss The Highlands: Critical Resources, Treasured Landscapes! The Highlands exemplifies why protection of New Jersey’s Highlands is so important for the future of the state. It is an essential read on the multiple resources of the region.

Click here for more information!

3.60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: New York City: Including northern New Jersey, southwestern Connecticut, and western Long Island – Packed with valuable tips and humorous observations, the guide prepares both novices and veterans for the outdoors. From secluded woods and sun-struck seashores, to lowland swamps and rock-strewn mountain tops, this practical guidebook contains all the information needed to have many great hikes in and around New York City.

Click here for more information!

4. Take a Hike New York City: 80 Hikes within Two Hours of Manhattan – In Moon Take a Hike New York City, award-winning writer Skip Card shows you the best hikes in and around The Big Apple—all within two hours of the city.

Click here for more information!

Feel free to Comment with Questions, Memories or Suggestions! Thank you and have fun exploring!

 

 

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Little Fall’s Morris Canal Preserve!


Morris Canal Preserve

Welcome to Little Fall’s Morris Canal Preserve!

Map of Little Fall’s Morris Canal Preserve

Walking on Little Falls Main Street, few people would suspect that a preserved woodland and forested floodplain is located behind the stores.

Passaic River Basalt

The Morris Canal Preserve is located right above the Passaic River. The river rushes by on fractured basalt .  The preserve features a gentle paved path which traverses the edge between the developed landscape of Little Falls and the remnant forested floodplain of the Passaic River.

Gazebo Morris Canal Preserve

The paved path leads from a beautiful gazebo and heads  in a southwest direction to its terminus near an outflow from the Passaic Valley Water Company.

Outflow

You might be tempted to think that Little Falls was named after these views, but the real falls were eliminated late in the 18th century to relieve upstream flooding of the Passaic River.

The path features checkerboards, basalt rocks of the second Watchung Mountain and beautiful views along the way.

Basalt Rock

Morris Canal

Morris Canal Crossed Here Passaic County

A portion of the 102 mile Morris Canal flowed over the Passaic River via an aquaduct created in 1829 of local Little Falls Brownstone.

Morris Canal Passage Little Falls (Red Line)

The Morris Canal was an artificial waterway which connected the coal fields of Pennsylvania’s LeHigh Valley to Paterson, Newark & New York City. Successful at first, railroads eventually replaced the need for the canal. After falling into disrepair, the Aqueduct was dynamited to the ground in 1925.

Flora

Canada Mayflower

Typical examples of flora found along the Morris Canal Preserve include:

American Beech

Tulip Tree

Shadbush

Highbush Blueberry

Maple-Leaf Viburnum

Want to learn more about the high diversity of plant life found in the Garden State? Check out Plant Communities of New Jersey.

NJ’s geology, topography and soil, climate, plant-plant and plant-animal relationships, and the human impact on the environment are all discussed in great detail. Twelve plant habitats are described and the authors were good enough to put in examples of where to visit!

Click here for more information!

 Directions: (as taken from the NYNJCT Botany Website)

From Route 80 westbound, get off at the Union Avenue exit and bear left to follow Union Avenue for about one mile into Little Falls. Turn left at the light onto Main Street and then go about five blocks looking for Maple Street and Schumacher Chevrolet on the left. Turn left down Maple and continue as for the bus directions.

Alternative route by car: From Rt. 46 westbound, get off at the Great Notch/Cedar Grove exit. Bear left and follow overpass over Route 46 on to Notch Road. At the end of Notch Road turn right at the light onto Long Hill Road. Proceed on Long Hill Road for about one mile where it becomes Main Street. At Schumacher Chevrolet, turn right onto Maple Street and then follow the directions as for the bus. Look for the brick sign for the preserve on the left.

By public transportation: Take NJ TRANSIT 191/195 bus that leaves the Port Authority Bus Terminal, NY (check schedule prior to the trip) and get off on Main Street in downtown Little Falls at the corner of Maple Street Turn right on Maple and walk one block to entrance to the preserve parking lot on the left.

Morris Canal Preserve Forest

Great Local Books!

1. An American River: From paradise to superfund, alfoat on New Jersey’s Passaic

New Jersey’s Passaic River rises in a pristine wetland and ends in a federal Superfund site. In An American River, author and New Jersey native Mary Bruno kayaks its length in an effort to discover what happened to her hometown river.

Click Here for more information!

2. The Morris Canal: Across by Water and Rail (Images of America: New Jersey)

The Morris Canal was an important component in the American Industrial Revolution. For nearly 100 years it crossed the hills of northern New Jersey, accomplishing that feat with 23 lift locks and 23 inclined planes.

Click Here for more information!

Feel free to e-mail NJUrbanForest at NJUrbanForest@gmail.com with any comments, memories or suggestion! Thank you and have fun exploring!

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