Tag Archives: New Jersey

Browns Point Park West Milford New Jersey


Browns Point Park Sign

Brown's Point Park

Brown’s Point Park

 

Browns Point Park in West Milford features a playground, picnic tables, woods and beautiful Greenwood Lake shoreline in addition to almost three and a half acres of wetlands. The park, located on the southwestern side of Greenwood Lake, has the Lake to the north and east, Belcher’s Creek to the west and Greenwood Lake Turnpike to the south.

Flora found in Brown’s Point Park includes the below among others:

 

Brown's Point Park 10.05 (18)

Greenwood Lake

Browns Point Park features Frisbee golf (aka disc golf) which is set up throughout the park.

Device

Frisbee Golf

Mute Swan was present in Greenwood Lake the day I visited. Mute Swans originated from Europe and are not native to the US. The Mute Swan, according to legend, is silent all its life until right before it dies where the bird sings an achingly beautiful melody known as a “Swan Song“. The real story is Mute Swans are not mute but actually make a deep grunting territorial sound.  Click here to hear a Mute Swan for yourself!

Mute Swan

Mute Swan Greenwood Lake

Brown’s Point Park provides wonderful opportunities for recreation, nature study and birding.

Peace Love

Peace Brother

Brown’s Point park is located off of Greenwood Lake Turnpike near A&P in the Hewitt section of West Milford. Click here for directions!

Great Books!

1. Disc Golf: All You Need to Know About the Game You Want to Play This handy reference provides techniques for mastering disc golf. Equipment and throwing techniques are detailed. Cleverly done illustrations, tips, and photographs depict various grips and stances of the game!

Click Here for more Information!

2. Check out Plant Communities of New Jersey.

NJ’s geology, topography and soil, climate, plant-plant and plant-animal relationships, and the human impact on the environment are all discussed in great detail. Twelve plant habitats are described and the authors were good enough to put in examples of where to visit!

Click here for more information!

3. Don’t miss The Highlands: Critical Resources, Treasured Landscapes! The Highlands exemplifies why protection of New Jersey’s Highlands is so important for the future of the state. It is an essential read on the multiple resources of the region.

Click here for more information!

Feel free to comment below with any bird sightings, interesting plants, memories or suggestions! Thank you and have fun exploring!

Diamond Brook Park in Glen Rock!


Sometimes just finding a forest where you would not expect one is it’s own reward. Such is the case with Diamond Brook Park in Glen Rock, NJ.

Diamond Brook Park consists of an estimated 15 acres of remnant deciduous wooded wetlands.  The park has Diamond Brook to its west, NJ Transit tracks to its east, Route 208 to its south and dense residential development to its north.

Diamond Brook Park Sign

 

Trails

The park features three trails which are maintained by Eagle Scouts. The red trail is .4 of a mile,  the yellow is .13 of a mile and the blue trail is .21 of a mile. The yellow trail experiences seasonal flooding depending on the time of year you visit. The blue trail leads to an old railroad freight train turntable (used to rotate freight cars) which was once the largest turntable east of the Mississippi River. The freight turntable was used by the Erie Railroad Company until a fire occurred in 1912. The land was not used again for 40 years except for displaced residents who inhabited the forest during the Great Depression.  The land was sold to the town of Glen Rock in 1954 and was formally dedicated in 1959.

Trail Entrance

 

One of the neat things I found in this suburban forest was Ground Pine-something I had not previously seen outside the deep forest.

Ground Pine

Dense beds of Skunk Cabbage appear near Diamond Brook every spring. Black Bears, which love skunk cabbage, would have a feast. Speaking of bears, fauna that has been spotted in Diamond Brook Park include:

skunk cabbageWetlands

 

 

Diamond Brook, a tribuary of the Passaic River, flows on the western border of the park. The brook is spring fed with its headwaters located north of Glen Rock in Ridgewood. The brook follows a winding two mile course before its confluence with the Passaic River.  Diamond Brook was once called Bass Brook due to the good fishing that was once found there.  In the 1870’s, the Marinus Lumber Mill built a water wheel on the brook. When the mill was later torned down, the water wheel was buried beneath a street and is still there today.

Diamond Brook

Location

Diamond Brook Park is located at the end of Doremus Avenue and West Main Street in Glen Rock.  The park is part of Glen Rock’s Greenway.

Diamond Brook Park April 10, 2010 (149)

 

Feel free to comment below with any bird sightings, interesting plants, memories or suggestions! Thank you and have fun exploring!

Exploring Bogota’s Oscar E Olsen Park


Oscar E. Olsen Park

Welcome to Oscar E. Olsen Park!  The park consists of the largest remaining open space in Bogota, NJ and should be considered it’s crown jewel.

Oscar E Olsen Park

Oscar E Olsen Park

Oscar E Olsen Park was built on former marshland adjacent to the Hackensack River.

Gazebo

Though an urban park, wildlife abounds for the patient observer. I was rewarded with a Bald Eagle flying over the Hackensack River along with an American Goldfinch.

Oscar E Olsen Park 2.15  Bald Eagle on Hackensack (2)

Bald Eagle over Hackensack River

American Goldfinch

American Goldfinch Oscar E Olsen Park

A focal point of the park is a bridge known as  “The Olsen Park Hackensack River Environmental Walkway”.  The walkway is a raised boardwalk strategically built next to the Hackensack River. Educational signs have been  placed with assistance from  the  Hackensack Riverkeeper and Ducks Unlimited with information on the fauna of the adjacent Hackensack River. The signs describe typical flora and fauna of the Hackensack River and the nearby Meadowlands.

Olsen Park Environmental Boardwalk

The Olsen Park Hackensack River Environmental Walkway was originally built in 1993 and was known as a “bridge to nowhere”.  A lot of people thought it was a waste of tax payer money when it was built. From the walkway you can view the nearby World War II era submarine USS Ling.

 

USS Ling

USS Ling with Bergen County Courthouse in background

The New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority added educational signage regarding flora and fauna found in this section of the Hackensack River which is just north of the New Jersey Meadowlands.

Educational Signage

 

There is a pathway which extends from the bridge that encircles the park.

Olsen Park Walkway

Olsen Park is a great place to explore and view wildlife on the Hackensack River.

Olsen Park Cottonwood Trees

Directions: 

From NYC: Go West over the George Washington Bridge; Route 4 west; get off at the exit for River Road just before the bridge over the Hackensack River.  Head south on River Road.  At the junction with West Main Street on the left, turn right.  On the left is an entrance for the park.

Feel free to comment with any questions, memories or suggestions! Thank you and have fun exploring!

Pequannock River Coalition 2010 Winter Hike!


Just found out the picture below taken on the 2010 winter hike with the Pequannock River Coalition appeared in its bi-monthly newsletter!

Beaver Dam

It was a great hike-very informative. I encourage all to learn more about the Pequannock River Coalition and its efforts.I will finish this post with some more pictures from the hike:

Bobcat Track

White Oak

Winter Scene

Ridgewood’s Dunham Trail!


Dunham Trail Village of Ridgewood

Dunham Trail Village of Ridgewood

Welcome to Ridgewood’s Dunham Trail!

The Dunham Trail is about 1/4 of a mile (one way) and takes the hiker through an estimated 9.61 acres of deciduous forest and wooded wetlands.  The trail is named  after Dr. Dunham who was a nature consultant for the Ridgewood school district. The Dunham trail is owned by the village and maintained by the Ridgewood Wildscape Association as one of ten wildscape areas found in the village. The Ridgewood Wildscape Association helps to raise awareness for the remaining natural areas in the township.

Ho-Ho-Kus Brook

Ho-Ho-Kus Brook

The trail is bordered by the Ho-Ho-Kus brook to the east, dense residential development to the west, Grove Street to the south and Spring Ave to the north.

Dunham Trail 12.12 (40)

 

The Dunham trail is flat and follows the artificial path of the Ho-Ho-Kus Brook (a tributary of the Saddle River) for its entire length and features uplands and an estimated 3.6 acres of remnant wetlands. The wetlands are found near the Grove Street entrance. Check out Eastern Deciduous Forest Ecology and Wildlife Conservation for more information on your local woods.

 

Some notes of interest on the trail include sandstone which was mined from Totowa, NJ which was placed alongside of the Dunham Trail for unknown reasons.

Sandstones mined from Totowa

Sandstone mined from Totowa

The trail also features several massive American Sycamores that are at least two hundred years old found near the Spring Avenue entrance.

Massive  American Sycamore

Massive American Sycamore

Other flora includes:

Trout Lily

Trout Lily

Common Blue Violet

Common Blue Violet

Indian Pipe

Indian Pipe

Check out Plant Communities of New Jersey.

NJ’s geology, topography and soil, climate, plant-plant and plant-animal relationships, and the human impact on the environment are all discussed in great detail. Twelve plant habitats are described and the authors were good enough to put in examples of where to visit!

Click here for more information!

Animals that have been observed on the Dunham Trail include:

Mallard on Ho-Ho-Kus Brook

Mallard on Ho-Ho-Kus Brook

Downy Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

The Dunham trail ends at Spring Avenue.

Ridgewood Dunham Trail

The Dunham trail is located between Grove Street and Spring Avenue along the Ho Ho Kus brook and the public service right-of-way. Parking is available on South Irving Street. My hope is this post inspires you to check out the Dunham Trail for yourself!

Check out the official Ridgewood Wildscape Youtube video of the Dunham Trail!

Feel free to comment below with any bird sightings, interesting plants, memories or suggestions! Thank you and have fun exploring!

Click Here to check out the latest bird sightings on the Dunham Trail!