Tag Archives: Pond

Exploring Harts Brook Nature Preserve!


Hart's Brook Park & Preserve

Hart’s Brook Park & Preserve

Welcome to the Hart’s Brook Nature Preserve! The preserve features woodlands and wetlands, a master garden and hiking trails. Prior to becoming a preserve the property was known as the Gaisman Estate and was owned by the inventor of the famous Gillette safety razor blade Henry Gaisman. In 1957, Gaisman passed the title of the estate to the New York Archdiocese. In later years, Marion Woods Convent took ownership of 11.5 acres of the estate. The remaining acreage was purchased by the State of New York (who retains 50% ownership of the property) Westchester County and the Town of Greenburgh in 1999.

Hart's Brook Nature Preserve

Hart’s Brook Nature Preserve

Virtual Hike

Harts Brook Nature Preserve Trail Map

Harts Brook Nature Preserve Trail Map

Welcome to our virtual hike! Today we are going to cross brooks, pass interesting rock outcroppings and walk around 2 miles on 5 different trails! Our guide will be the trail map shown above.

Red Trail Meadow

Red Trail Meadow

Ready to start? From the parking area, let’s head west briefly entering the forest on the red trail. Paralleling Ridge Road, the Red Trail leaves the forest and walks through an open meadow flanked by enormous Norway Spruce trees.

Norway Spruce Red Trail

Norway Spruce Red Trail

As we walk past the Norway Spruce trees we pass a spur of the red trail to our left which leads back to the parking lot. Deciduous wooded wetlands are appearing to our right as we leave the meadow and re-enter the woods. Wait! What’s that sound? Spring Peepers! Spring Peepers are a small frog common in wetlands and are among the first frogs to call out in early spring. Thus, Spring Peepers are a true harbinger of spring! Their Latin name (Pseudacris Crucifer) is named because of a dark cross which forms an “x” on the frog’s dorsa. Because of their size, Spring Peepers are difficult to locate and we do not see any today.

Green Trail Blaze

Green Trail Blaze

Continuing south we have come to the end of the red trail and are at an intersection with the green trail. According to our trail map we will come to a pond if we head east on the Green Trail.

Going to the Pond

Going to the Pond

Let’s go east on the green trail and check it out. After only a few minutes of walking we’ve found that we have left the green trail and are now on the yellow trail. The flora is quickly changing from deciduous forest to evergreens consisting of stately Eastern Hemlocks and Rosebay Rhododendron the closer we get to the pond.

Eastern Hemlock

Eastern Hemlock

The Hemlocks have an overall healthy appearance with very little die-back from the Hemlock Wooly Adelgid. The Hemlock Wooly Adelgid is an exotic pest from Asia accidently introduced to North America circa 1924 and is currently established in eleven states ranging from Georgia to Massachusetts. It is estimated that 50% of the geographical range of the Eastern Hemlock has been affected by the adelgid. Biological control (i.e. using adelgid predators to control infestations) has been the major emphasis of control since 1997.

Yellow Trail Bridge

Yellow Trail Bridge

Crossing a wooden bridge over Harts Brook we come to a bench overlooking the pond and its outflow dam.

Yellow Trail Bench with view of Pond

Yellow Trail Bench with view of Pond

Let’s pause for a few moments and take in the beauty of our surroundings.

Hart's Brook Park Pond

Hart’s Brook Park Pond

After taking in the view of the pond we’re going to continue northeast on the yellow trail following the shore of the pond. As we walk we pass several Wood Duck nesting boxes.

Wood Duck Box GNC

Wood Duck Box GNC

The nesting boxes were placed here by the nearby Greenburgh Nature Center to provide nesting habitat for Wood Ducks.

Stone Warming House

Stone Warming House

As we continue walking on the yellow trial we pass an old stone warming house which was part of the original Gaisman Estate. Leaving the stone warming house, the yellow trail is taking us east back to a branch of the green trail.

Orange Trail

Orange Trail

Heading south on the green trail we find ourselves on an orange blaze trail heading east.

Rock Outcrop Orange Trail

Rock Outcrop Orange Trail

An interesting large rock outcrop appears to our left as we slightly climb on the orange trail.

Blue Trail

Blue Trail

We are now at an intersection with the blue blazed trail and it sounds like we are hearing more music of spring!

American Robins

American Robins

American Robins are searching for lunch and making sure we know they are present.

Updated Bridge

Blue Trail Stream Crossing

 

Heading east on the blue trail we find ourselves crossing a brook.

Pine Grove Blue Trail

Pine Grove Blue Trail

Passing close to private residences the blue trail turns northeast and slightly climbs through a grove of White Pine trees.

Blue Trail Seasonal View of Hartsdale Lake

Blue Trail Seasonal View of Hartsdale Lake

Looking east we can see views of Hartsdale Lake  (part of Scarsdale Country Golf Club).

Blue Trail Asphalt Path

Blue Trail Asphalt Path

As we pass a spur of the blue trail on the left the trail now becomes an asphalt path as we come close to the Maple Avenue entrance to the preserve. From here we follow the blue trail west back to the orange trail.

Blue Trail Stream Crossing as seen from Orange Trail

Blue Trail Stream Crossing as seen from Orange Trail

The stream crossing we did earlier on the blue trail is visible to our left.

Green Trail

Green Trail

We are now back at the Green Trail we left a while back. Let’s head north which will take us back to the yellow trail.

Master Gardening

Master Gardening

After only a short distance on the yellow trail we have just stepped out of the woods and are by the master garden area of the preserve. We are now back at the parking lot where we began. Thank you for joining me today on this virtual hike! I hope it has inspired you to check out Hartsbrook Nature Preserve for yourself!

Shagbark Hickory

 

The preserve is located at 156 Ridge Road, Hartsdale, NY.

Check below for additional information!

1. The Nature of New York – An Environmental History of the Empire State – This work offers a sweeping environmental history of New York State

Click here for more information!

2. Eastern Deciduous Forest Ecology and Wildlife Conservation – This book is a useful tool for anyone who wants know or hopes to help one of North America’s great natural resources!

Click here for more information!

 Feel free to comment below with any bird sightings, interesting plants, memories or suggestions! Thank you and have fun exploring!

Check out the latest bird sightings here!

 

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James A. McFaul Environmental Center!


James A McFaul Environmental Center

The James A McFaul Environmental Center is an 81 acre nature preserve located in Wyckoff, NJ.

James McFaul Environmental Center

The environmental center was originally a pig farm and was acquired by Bergen County in 1962 with assistance from Green Acres.  It was named the James A. McFaul Environmental Center in 1990 to honor a Bergen County parks director who did much to acquire this beautiful nature preserve.

Pond

The 2.5 acre pond was created in 1966 by impounding a Goffle Brook tributary.

Goffle Brook Tributary

A boardwalk extends out over wetlands and provides views of the pond.

Environmental Boardwalk

The educational center, which looks out into the pond, includes freshwater aquariums, educational signage and live native animal displays.

Life in a Pond Educational Display

There are outdoor animal shelters which features Porcupine, White-Tailed DeerGolden Eagle, Red Fox, Eastern Screech Owls and Red-Tailed Hawk exhibits among others.

Porcupine

Outdoor Turtle Display

In addition to live animal displays, the James A. McFaul Environmental Center provides much needed habitat to a multitude of birds and other native wildlife such as:

Mourning Dove

Brown-Headed Cowbird

Canada Goose

White-Tailed Deer

Wild Turkey

Eastern Chipmunk

Muskrat

Near the entrance to the environmental center, there are Rhododendron and seasonal Daffodil gardens to be enjoyed.

Gardens

Nature Trail

Welcome to the Nature Center!

The preserve features a 2/3 of a mile interpretive nature trail which loops around a seasonal swamp and upland.

Deciduous wooded wetlands

As you wind along the path, keep your eyes peeled for wildlife such as White-Tailed Deer, Eastern Chipmunks and Red-Tailed Hawks. Frequent signage appears on the trail to help the hiker to identify the surrounding flora and fauna.

Lowland Habitat Interpretive Signage

Tree Cavity Interpretive Signage

Flora includes the below among others:

Check out Plant Communities of New Jersey.

NJ’s geology, topography and soil, climate, plant-plant and plant-animal relationships, and the human impact on the environment are all discussed in great detail. Twelve plant habitats are described and the authors were good enough to put in examples of where to visit!

Click here for more information!

Want to check out the James A. McFaul Environmental Center for yourself? Click here for directions (or put this address in your GPS: 150 Crescent Ave. Wyckoff, NJ 07481)!

Feel free to comment below with any bird sightings, interesting plants, memories or suggestions! Thank you and have fun exploring!

Check out the latest bird sightings here!

Saddle River County Park!


Bergen County’s Saddle River County Park is a wonderful 577 acre linear greenway which parallels the Saddle River.  There are six park areas and a historic site which are all linked by a paved path which may be used by bicycles, pedestrians and roller skating.  Click here to view maps of the six areas of the trail.  The total length of the trail is six miles. Mileage signs appear every tenth of a mile on the path to help see how far you have progressed.

Fishing is allowed throughout the park with a license at the trout stocked Saddle River and Ho-Ho-Kus Brook as well as the three ponds found throughout the park. (The Ho-Ho-Kus Brook is trout stocked from Whites Pond in Waldwick until its confluence with the Saddle River).

Saddle River Pathway BEGIN

The northern section of the park begins in Ridgewood at the Wild Duck Pond Area. The Ridgewood Area of the park features the Wild Duck Pond, Dog Run, picnic area and playground.

Wild Ducks at Wild Duck Pond

The trail continues through to Glen Rock, Fair LawnParamus, Saddle Brook and Rochelle Park. On the way to Paramus and Glen Rock areas the trail passes by Ridgewood’s Grove Park, a 32 acre Beech-Oak forest which features hiking trails.
Pathway

Saddle River County Park Glen Rock

The Glen Rock Area features a pond, playground and tennis. The Ho-Ho-Kus Brook flows to the east of the park. The brook has no mow zones to help clean the water and provide habitat for wildlife.

Heading south from the Glen Rock Area will go to the Fair Lawn Area which features soccer and a section for hangers/gliders and to the Dunkerhook Area of the park in Paramus.  Dunkerhook (which means “Dark Corner”) was named by the Dutch who first settled in this area in the early 18th Century.  This section of the park features a beautiful waterfall at the confluence of the Ho-Ho-Kus Brook with the Saddle River in addition to a picnic area and playground.

Waterfall at confluence of Ho-Ho-Kus Brook and Saddle River

Saddle River County Park Dunkerhook Area

Just south of the Dunkerhook Area and after passing underneath Route 4 is the Easton Tower.

Easton Tower

The Easton Tower was initially built in 1900 to pump water for the estate of Edward Easton who made his fortune as a founder in the recording industry and was president of the Columbia Phonograph Company. Water from the tower was pumped to several fountains. Construction of nearby Route 208 divided the estate and isolated the tower. The tower was acquired by Bergen County in 1956 and restored a few years later. An earlier red mill tower which stood in its place sometimes leads to the present tower being mistakenly called the “Red Mill”.

Remixed

Once pass the Easton Tower, the trail leads to the Otto C. Pehle Area in Saddle Brook. This section features a pond, model boating (permit required), ball fields, playground and picnic areas.

Otto C. Pehle Area

Canada Geese

The final and most southern area of the linear park is the Rochelle Park Area.

Saddle River County Park Rochelle Park

This section of the park features basketball, tennis, and a picnic area. The trail’s terminus is at Railroad Avenue.

Trail Terminus at Railroad Ave

Flora at the park include:

Fauna includes the below among others:
Groundhog

Groundhog

White-Breasted Nuthatch

White-Breasted Nuthatch

Great Egret

Great Egret

Cottontail Rabbit

Cottontail Rabbit

Painted Turtle

For more information check out the NY NJ Trail Conference description.

Hiking/Ecology Books!
1. 60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: New York City: Including northern New Jersey, southwestern Connecticut, and western Long Island – Packed with valuable tips and humorous observations, the guide prepares both novices and veterans for the outdoors. From secluded woods and sun-struck seashores, to lowland swamps and rock-strewn mountain tops, this practical guidebook contains all the information needed to have many great hikes in and around New York City.

Click here for more information!

2. Take a Hike New York City: 80 Hikes within Two Hours of Manhattan – In Moon Take a Hike New York City, award-winning writer Skip Card shows you the best hikes in and around The Big Apple—all within two hours of the city.

Click here for more information!

3. Eastern Deciduous Forest, Second Edition: Ecology and Wildlife Conservation – This book is a useful tool for anyone who wants to know or hopes to help one of North America’s great natural resources.

Click here for more information!

4. Protecting New Jersey’s Environment: From Cancer Alley to the New Garden State – With people as its focus, Protecting New Jersey’s Environment explores the science underpinning environmental issues and the public policy infighting that goes undocumented behind the scenes and beneath the controversies.

Click here for more information!

Feel free to comment below with any bird sightings, interesting plants, memories or suggestions! Thank you and have fun exploring!

Check out the latest bird sightings at Saddle River Park Here!

Pascack Brook County Park Volunteer Opportunity!!!!


An unique opportunity will open up to the general public to help plant native plants and remove invasive plants around the pond at Pascack Brook County Park in Westwood NJ on the weekend of May 15th and 16th. There will be a training session and breakfast/lunch will be served. Click here for more information.

Pascack Brook