Tag Archives: Red Oak

Ridgewood’s Twinney Park!


Twinney Park

Twinney Park

Welcome to Ridgewood’s Twinney Park! The park is owned by the Village of Ridgewood and is maintained by the Ridgewood Wildscape Association.

Twinney Pond

Ridgewood’s Twinney Pond

Twinney Park, located off of Red Birch Court, has Valleau Cemetery to the southeast, Franklin Turnpike to the North and dense residential development to the south and west. Ridgewater Water, which supplies water to an estimated 65,000 residents in Ridgewood, Glen Rock, Midland Park and Wyckoff has Twinney Well located to the east of the park.

Ridgewood Water Dept Twinney Well

Ridgewood Water Dept Twinney Well

Twinney Park’s three acres consist of remnant deciduous woodlands and freshwater wetlands. The focal point of the park is Twinney Pond. Twinney Pond, at almost an acre, is a figure eight shaped freshwater body of water created from glaciers.

Twinney Pond

Twinney Pond

Trail

Twinney Pond Trail Map

Twinney Pond Trail Map

A rough trail encircles the pond. Occasionally the path is laden with woodchips. The trail goes through upland and freshwater wetland habitat.

Mallards and Ducklings on Twinney Pond

Mallards and Ducklings on Twinney Pond

Twinney Pond is home to Mallards, Wood Ducks and other waterfowl.  American Bullfrogs and Green Frogs can be heard seasonally.  The surrounding remnant woodland is home to countless Eastern Chipmunks and Eastern Gray Squirrels as well as other mammals.

Flora

The pond and woodlands features  a nice diversity of flora including:

False Solomon's Seal

False Solomon’s Seal

The park is open from dusk to dawn. It is absolutely amazing to find a natural pond teeming with wildlife in such a built up area. Click here for directions.

Feel free to comment below with any bird sightings, interesting plants, memories or suggestions! Thank you and have fun exploring!

Kinnelon’s Kakeout Reservoir!


Butler Water Supply Kakeout Reservoir

Butler Water Supply Kakeout Reservoir

Kakeout Reservoir

Kakeout Reservoir

Kakeout Reservoir, at 150 acres, was constructed in the 1930’s by the works progress administration by impounding Stone House Brook (a Pequannock River Tributary) over an old roadway connecting Butler and Kinnelon. Most of Stone House Brook, a Pequannock River tributary, is classified by the NJ DEP primarily as FW2-NT (Fresh Water, Non-Trout).  Water with this classification are generally not suitable for trout because of physical, chemical or biological characteristics but may be suitable for a wide variety of other fish.

Stone House Brook

Stone House Brook

Kakeout Reservoir holds up to 950 million gallons of water and serves an estimated 9,600 people in Butler, West Milford and Kinnelon. Fishing in Kakeout Reservoir is allowed by permit only.

Fishing by Permit Only

Fishing by Permit Only

Trails

While it is possible to do a loop around the reservoir, I prefer to take the blue blazed Butler-Montville trail north of Fayson Lake Road to Kakeout dam and back. This trail is maintained by volunteers of the New York New Jersey Trail Conference.

Welcome

Blue Blaze Butler-Montville Trail

Blue Blaze Butler-Montville Trail

If you take the Butler-Montville Trail south of Fayson Lakes Road it will lead to Pyramid Mountain and its famous Tripod Rock. Taking this trail north of Fayson Lakes Road goes slightly west with views of the reservoir and a small island.

Small Island on Kakeour Reservoir

The trail then heads north to a bridge which goes over Stone House Brook.

Footbridge over Stone House Brook

Footbridge over Stone House Brook

Once you cross over Stone House Brook, the trail turns to the east and passes Kakeout Mountain to the northwest. The trail then hugs the Reservoir until you reach the dam.

Kakeout Reservoir Dam with Wetlands

Kakeout Reservoir Dam with Wetlands

There are wetlands beyond the dam where Stone House Brook once again narrows to form a stream which flows northeast. Stone House Brook (also called Kakeout Brook at this location) becomes C1 trout production from Lake Edenwold downstream. C1 is one of the highest classifications given to a stream in the state of NJ.

Once you reach the dam, turn around and follow the trail back to Fayson Lakes Road where the hike began.

Shoreline of Kakeout Reservoir

Shoreline of Kakeout Reservoir

Flora:

Daisy Fleabane growing Kakeout Reservoir Dam

Daisy Fleabane

Indian Pipe

Indian Pipe

Check out Plant Communities of New Jersey.

NJ’s geology, topography and soil, climate, plant-plant and plant-animal relationships, and the human impact on the environment are all discussed in great detail. Twelve plant habitats are described and the authors were good enough to put in examples of where to visit!

Click here for more information!

Directions:

From Route 23 in Kinnelon, take Kinnelon Road exit. Drive for about two miles and take a left on Fayson Lake Road. Parking is near the first causeway.

Great Ecology/Hiking Books!

1. Eastern Deciduous Forest Ecology and Wildlife Conservation – This book is a useful tool for anyone who wants know or hopes to help one of North America’s great natural resources!

Click here for more information!

2.60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: New York City: Including northern New Jersey, southwestern Connecticut, and western Long Island – Packed with valuable tips and humorous observations, the guide prepares both novices and veterans for the outdoors. From secluded woods and sun-struck seashores, to lowland swamps and rock-strewn mountain tops, this practical guidebook contains all the information needed to have many great hikes in and around New York City.

Click here for more information!

Feel free to comment below with any bird sightings, interesting plants, memories or suggestions! Thank you and have fun exploring!

Teaneck’s Tokaloka Park!


Tokoloka Park Entrance at Maitland Avenue and Jefferson Street

Tokoloka Park Entrance at Maitland Avenue and Jefferson Street

Teaneck’s Tokaloka Park is a remnant 10.58 acre deciduous wooded wetland. The preserve is completely surrounded  by dense housing development making the park a true forest island.

Tokoloka Park

Tokaloka Park

Tokaloka Park was once part of 50 acres of land owned by Christian Cole who was one of the township’s first council members. The land that ultimately became Tokaloka Park consists of over 70% of forested wetlands and was considered unsuitable for development when suburban sprawl began in the 1930s. The name of the park was derived from a large pond that once existed in the park called Tokaloka. Tokaloka pond may be gone, but a vernal pond still exists near the western border.

Vernal Pool

Vernal Pool in Winter

Below is a picture of the same vernal pond taken in the summer months.

Dried Vernal Pool in summer

Dried Vernal Pool in summer

Many signs exist in this nature preserve indicating that the land is a remnant forested wetland. For example, skunk cabbage is abundant throughout most of the woodland. Skunk cabbage is an obligate plant-meaning that it is found growing in wetlands 99% of the time.

Skunk Cabbage

Skunk Cabbage

Another indicator that wetlands abound is the presence of  several buttressed tree trunks. Trees may develop enlarged trunks  in response to frequent inundation.

Buttressed tree trunk

Buttressed tree trunk

Finally, there were several smaller vernal ponds present in the forest.

Small Vernal Pond

Small Vernal Pond

Trail

As of this writing the only official trail is a gently sloping path which leads from the entrance to the park at Maitland Avenue and Jefferson Street to its terminus at Dearborn Street. However, future plans, as indicated in the picture listed below, show a possible trail traversing the northern portion of the preserve including a loop around the vernal pond. This trail is recommended to have interpretive signage which would be a real plus in educating the public the value of this remnant natural area.

Tokoloka Park Trail Map

Tokaloka Park Trail Map

These changes were proposed in the 2008 Township of Teaneck comprehensive plan for recreation (this plan is no longer available online). The short (estimated .15 of a mile) existing trail only encourages you to really take your time and enjoy the sights and sounds of this unique woodland. The forest is always changing as indicated in the pictures below of the same scene taken at summer and winter.

Tokoloka Park Summer View

Tokaloka Park Summer View

Tokoloka Park Winter View

Tokaloka Park Winter View

Flora

In addition to skunk cabbage, the forest features a nice diversity of plants. They include:

Solomon Seal

Solomon’s Seal

Fauna

The most amazing and unexpected event occurred last time I visited. Several White-tailed deer were present near the main vernal pond and took off with their white tail in the air as I arrived near them. What a surprise to find in a forest island completely surrounded by development!

Directions:

Click here

Feel free to comment below with any bird sightings, interesting plants, memories or suggestions! Thank you and have fun exploring!

Ridgewood’s Grove Park


Grove Park Village of Ridgewood, NJ

Grove Park Village of Ridgewood, NJ

Grove Park

Grove Park

Grove Park is a 32 acre deciduous forest and wetland owned by the village of Ridgewood, NJ and maintained by the Ridgewood Wildscape Association.

Grove Park Map

Grove Park

The forest was purchased with Green Acres funding. Grove Park has dense residential development to the west, the confluence of the artificial paths of the Ho-Ho-Kus Brook and Saddle River to the south, Grove Street to the north and the Saddle River Pathway and Saddle River to the east.

Saddle River Pathway next to Grove Park

Saddle River Pathway next to Grove Park

In 1996, the Ridgewood Sports Council proposed to destroy a portion of Grove park for a sports field.  Residents from the nearby developments and the Ridgewood Council opposed this proposal as the woodland is environmentally sensitive and the remnant forest was preserved.

Trails

Grove Park Trail Map

Grove Park Trail Map

The park contains several trails. I found (as listed in the picture above) the best combination is to do a loop trail by combining the .34 of a mile White blazed trail with .28 of the .36 of a mile Yellow blazed trail for a total of .62 of a mile. From the entrance on Grove Street, walk to the white trail which traverses the western portion of the park through a wetland area. I usually spot white-tail deer in this area running away with their white tails upheld high.

Deer Hooves

Blurry Deer Hooves in the mud

Take the white trail until it terminates on a White Oak near the yellow trail to the east of the woods.

White Trail Terminus on White Oak

White Trail Terminus on White Oak

Follow the yellow trail north back to the entrance on Grove street. Be careful, during my last visit there were several large blowdowns blocking the trail. I just ducked and went under some and crawled over others.

Blowdown

Blowdown on the Yellow Trail

The interesting thing about blowdowns is eventually all that dirt that surrounds the root structure will eventually come down and form a sort of pillow near the tree. These pillows, if left undisturbed, can last hundreds of years and are a way to determine if a forest is old growth. A forest that lacks these pillows was most likely farmed within the past hundred years or so.

Another way of reading the forested landscape is looking at bizarre tree formations. This American Beech tree in the picture below (found on the White Trail) was tipped by the wind and eventually was able to righten itself.

Wind-tipped American Beech

Wind-tipped American Beech

Grove Park provides much needed habitat for the fauna that inhabit this densely developed area of north jersey.  Just like with the deer prints, I found evidence of raccoon prints (which look like little  hands) in the mud.

Raccoon Prints

Raccoon Prints

Plus I’ve have seen these other characters during my travels in this suburban woodland:

Mallards on Vernal Pond

Mallards on Vernal Pond

American Robin

American Robin

Eastern Chipmunk

Blurry Eastern Chipmunk

Red-belly woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Salamander

Salamander

Red Tail Hawk

Red-Tailed Hawk

Grove Park features quite a diversity of flora. Flora I’ve found includes:

False Hellebore

False Hellebore

White Wood Aster

White Wood Aster

Trout Lily

Trout Lily

Marsh Marigold

Lesser Celandine

In early spring Lesser Celandine (an invasive plant) carpets the floor of Grove Park.

Thank you for tagging along in this virtual exploration of Ridgewood’s Grove Park!

Grove Park is located on the south side of Grove Street, just west of the Saddle River in Ridgewood, NJ.

Check out Plant Communities of New Jersey.

NJ’s geology, topography and soil, climate, plant-plant and plant-animal relationships, and the human impact on the environment are all discussed in great detail. Twelve plant habitats are described and the authors were good enough to put in examples of where to visit!

Click here for more information!

The entrance to this park is available from Grove Street or off of the nearby Saddle River pathway. Parking is available on Berkshire Road which is located to the west of the park and is a quick walk away from the entrance. Click here for directions.

Local Ecology/Environment Books!

1. Eastern Deciduous Forest, Second Edition: Ecology and Wildlife Conservation – This book is a useful tool for anyone who wants to know or hopes to help one of North America’s great natural resources.

Click here for more information!

2. Protecting New Jersey’s Environment: From Cancer Alley to the New Garden State – With people as its focus, Protecting New Jersey’s Environment explores the science underpinning environmental issues and the public policy infighting that goes undocumented behind the scenes and beneath the controversies.

Click here for more information!

3. Wild New Jersey: Nature Adventures in the Garden State:

Wild New Jersey invites readers along Wheeler’s whirlwind year-long tour of the most ecologically diverse state for its size in America.

Click here for more information!

Feel free to comment below with any bird sightings, interesting plants, memories or suggestions! Thank you and have fun exploring!

Ringwood’s Jerry Wyckoff Natural Preserve!


The Jerry Wyckoff Natural Preserve

The Jerry Wyckoff Natural Preserve

The Jerry Wyckoff Natural Preserve is a 7.18 green acres woodland located in the Borough of Ringwood NJ.  The preserve is located on Fieldstone Drive off of Skyline Drive. It is named after the first chair of the Ringwood Environmental Commission. The Northgate Park housing development and Fieldstone Drive sit to the north of the preserve, Skyline Drive sits to the west and south of the preserve and High Mountain Brook flows to the east.

High Mountain Brook is a fresh water trout production stream with a C1 classification which is one of the highest classifications given to a stream in the state of NJ.  Its headwaters are formed from the artificially created 4 acre Brushwood Pond which contains Bass, Catfish and other aquatic life and flows in a south west direction until it terminates in the 39+ acre artificially created Skyline Lakes.

High Mountain Brook

High Mountain Brook

Part of the purpose of the preserve is to maintain the rural character of Ringwood. The 7.18 acre site was previously threatened with development by the name of Bald Eagle Suites . Bald Eagle Suites would have contained the largest buildings in Ringwood. The development would have consisted of four four story high buildings containing a total of 100 units of assisted living high density housing.  The North Jersey District Water Supply Commission which manages the nearby Wanaque Reservoir, opposed the development. NJDWS believed that runoff from the development would contaminate local reservoir feeding streams.

Jerry Wyckoff Natural Preserve Woodland

Jerry Wyckoff Natural Preserve Woodland

The development would have disturbed nearly 96% of the 7.18 acres by essentially blowing off the top of the mountain and moving 20 thousand cubic yards of soil for the construction of an entrance road and sewage treatment fields.  The site would have been stripped of trees and several large retaining walls would have been in place. Thanks to the combined efforts of Skylands Clean (an environmental organization that is defunct as of 2019) and the Ringwood Zoning Board, the development was denied and the 7.18 acres was purchase from the developer by Ringwood  for $600,000 on March 16, 2007.  Green Acres provided $300,000, Passaic County Open Space provided $250,000 and the municipal OS Trust provided $50,000.The preserve is the first open space initiative led exclusively by Ringwood.

Trail

The Jerry Wyckoff Nature Trail

The Jerry Wyckoff Nature Trail

Jerry Wyckoff Nature Preserve Trail Map (2)

Jerry Wyckoff Nature Preserve Trail Map

The estimated .27 of a mile orange blazed trail entrance is found off of Fieldstone Drive just north of the entrance to Stop and Shop. The trail was created and blazed by a local boy scout troup. No map is needed for this out and back trail. The total trail is an estimate .54 of a mile. Orange ribbons were found on many trees extending near the end of the trail during my last visit. This may indicate a longer planned trail for the future.

orange blazed trail

Orange Blazed Trail

The trail provides many scenic viewpoints of nearby highlands and the Wanaque Reservoir (especially when the leaves are gone from the trees!)

Scenic View

Scenic View

The trail terminates at a glacial erratic.

Glacial Erratic

Flora found along the trail include Christmas Fern, Sweet Fern, White Oak, Chestnut Oak and Red Oak, American Beech and Red Maple among others.

While not flora, I spotted this awesome little Eastern Chipmunk during a warmer month visit:

Eastern Chipmunk

Eastern Chipmunk

The Jerry Wyckoff Natural Preserve is located at the entrance to the center of town (Skyline Drive) from Route 287 (Exit 57) off of Fieldstone Drive. Parking is available in the nearby Stop and Shop.

The Jerry Wyckoff Natural Preserve

The Jerry Wyckoff Natural Preserve

Feel free to comment below with any bird sightings, interesting plants, memories or suggestions! Thank you and have fun exploring!