Tag Archives: Ridgewood

Ridgewood’s Twinney Park!


Twinney Park

Twinney Park

Welcome to Ridgewood’s Twinney Park! The park is owned by the Village of Ridgewood and maintained by the Ridgewood Wildscape Association.

Twinney Pond

Ridgewood’s Twinney Pond

Twinney Park, located off of Red Birch Court, has Valleau Cemetery to the southeast, Franklin Turnpike to the North and dense residential development to the south and west. Ridgewater Water, which supplies water to an estimated 65,000 residents in Ridgewood, Glen Rock, Midland Park and Wyckoff has Twinney Well located to the east of the park.

Ridgewood Water Dept Twinney Well

Ridgewood Water Dept Twinney Well

Twinney Park’s three acres consist of remnant deciduous woodlands and freshwater wetlands. The focal point of the park is Twinney Pond. Twinney Pond, at almost an acre, is a figure eight shaped freshwater body of water created from glaciers.

Twinney Pond

Twinney Pond

Trail

Twinney Pond Trail Map

Twinney Pond Trail Map

A rough trail encircles the pond. Occasionally the path is laden with woodchips. The trail goes through upland and freshwater wetland habitat.

Mallards and Ducklings on Twinney Pond

Mallards and Ducklings on Twinney Pond

Twinney Pond is home to Mallards, Wood Ducks and other waterfowl.  American Bullfrogs and Green Frogs can be heard seasonally.  The surrounding remnant woodland is home to countless Eastern Chipmunks and Eastern Gray Squirrels as well as other mammals.

Flora

The pond and woodlands features  a nice diversity of flora including:

False Solomon's Seal

False Solomon’s Seal

The park is open from dusk to dawn. It is absolutely amazing to find a natural pond teeming with wildlife in such a built up area. Click here for directions.

Feel free to comment below with any bird sightings, interesting plants, memories or suggestions! Thank you and have fun exploring!

Signs of Spring


Signs of spring have been slowly showing since the end of February when Skunk Cabbage flowers started to make an appearance.

Skunk Cabbage Flowers

And since the winter of 2010-2011 was an especially snowy and cold one, I thought it was important to show by way of photography how nature is renewing itself. Enjoy the spring photography tour!

Dutchman Breeches in Franklin Lakes Lorrimer Sanctuary

Dwarf Ginseng in Ridgewood's Grove Park

False Hellebore Sprouting in Ridgewood's Grove Park

Vernal Pond in Pequannock's Cherry Street Park

Trout Lilies carpeting floor of Hackensack's Borg's Woods

Spicebush blooming in Hackensack's Borg's Woods with understory of Skunk Cabbage

Pink Lady Slipper at Silas Condict County Park Kinnelon, NJ

Feel free to e-mail NJUrbanForest at NJUrbanForest@gmail.com with any comments, memories or suggestion! Thank you and have fun exploring!

Saddle River County Park!


Bergen County’s Saddle River County Park is a wonderful 577 acre linear greenway which parallels the Saddle River.  There are six park areas and a historic site which are all linked by a paved path which may be used by bicycles, pedestrians and roller skating.  Click here to view maps of the six areas of the trail.  The total length of the trail is six miles. Mileage signs appear every tenth of a mile on the path to help see how far you have progressed.

Fishing is allowed throughout the park with a license at the trout stocked Saddle River and Ho-Ho-Kus Brook as well as the three ponds found throughout the park. (The Ho-Ho-Kus Brook is trout stocked from Whites Pond in Waldwick until its confluence with the Saddle River).

Saddle River Pathway BEGIN

The northern section of the park begins in Ridgewood at the Wild Duck Pond Area. The Ridgewood Area of the park features the Wild Duck Pond, Dog Run, picnic area and playground.

Wild Ducks at Wild Duck Pond

The trail continues through to Glen Rock, Fair LawnParamus, Saddle Brook and Rochelle Park. On the way to Paramus and Glen Rock areas the trail passes by Ridgewood’s Grove Park, a 32 acre Beech-Oak forest which features hiking trails.
Pathway

Saddle River County Park Glen Rock

The Glen Rock Area features a pond, playground and tennis. The Ho-Ho-Kus Brook flows to the east of the park. The brook has no mow zones to help clean the water and provide habitat for wildlife.

Heading south from the Glen Rock Area will go to the Fair Lawn Area which features soccer and a section for hangers/gliders and to the Dunkerhook Area of the park in Paramus.  Dunkerhook (which means “Dark Corner”) was named by the Dutch who first settled in this area in the early 18th Century.  This section of the park features a beautiful waterfall at the confluence of the Ho-Ho-Kus Brook with the Saddle River in addition to a picnic area and playground.

Waterfall at confluence of Ho-Ho-Kus Brook and Saddle River

Saddle River County Park Dunkerhook Area

Just south of the Dunkerhook Area and after passing underneath Route 4 is the Easton Tower.

Easton Tower

The Easton Tower was initially built in 1900 to pump water for the estate of Edward Easton who made his fortune as a founder in the recording industry and was president of the Columbia Phonograph Company. Water from the tower was pumped to several fountains. Construction of nearby Route 208 divided the estate and isolated the tower. The tower was acquired by Bergen County in 1956 and restored a few years later. An earlier red mill tower which stood in its place sometimes leads to the present tower being mistakenly called the “Red Mill”.

Remixed

Once pass the Easton Tower, the trail leads to the Otto C. Pehle Area in Saddle Brook. This section features a pond, model boating (permit required), ball fields, playground and picnic areas.

Otto C. Pehle Area

Canada Geese

The final and most southern area of the linear park is the Rochelle Park Area.

Saddle River County Park Rochelle Park

This section of the park features basketball, tennis, and a picnic area. The trail’s terminus is at Railroad Avenue.

Trail Terminus at Railroad Ave

Flora at the park include:

Fauna includes the below among others:
Groundhog

Groundhog

White-Breasted Nuthatch

White-Breasted Nuthatch

Great Egret

Great Egret

Cottontail Rabbit

Cottontail Rabbit

Painted Turtle

For more information check out the NY NJ Trail Conference description.

Hiking/Ecology Books!
1. 60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: New York City: Including northern New Jersey, southwestern Connecticut, and western Long Island – Packed with valuable tips and humorous observations, the guide prepares both novices and veterans for the outdoors. From secluded woods and sun-struck seashores, to lowland swamps and rock-strewn mountain tops, this practical guidebook contains all the information needed to have many great hikes in and around New York City.

Click here for more information!

2. Take a Hike New York City: 80 Hikes within Two Hours of Manhattan – In Moon Take a Hike New York City, award-winning writer Skip Card shows you the best hikes in and around The Big Apple—all within two hours of the city.

Click here for more information!

3. Eastern Deciduous Forest, Second Edition: Ecology and Wildlife Conservation – This book is a useful tool for anyone who wants to know or hopes to help one of North America’s great natural resources.

Click here for more information!

4. Protecting New Jersey’s Environment: From Cancer Alley to the New Garden State – With people as its focus, Protecting New Jersey’s Environment explores the science underpinning environmental issues and the public policy infighting that goes undocumented behind the scenes and beneath the controversies.

Click here for more information!

Feel free to comment below with any bird sightings, interesting plants, memories or suggestions! Thank you and have fun exploring!

Check out the latest bird sightings at Saddle River Park Here!